Big Business
Mind the Drift


2.0
poor

Review

by Sobhi Youssef EMERITUS
May 10th, 2009 | 23 replies


Release Date: 2009 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Not the soundtrack to the ape-wrestling, head-banging, womanizing sludge madness one would expect.

After discovering the masculine nature of my first-born-in-waiting's gender this morning, I scoured my "To Review" queue for something to celebrate. Abstract Rude? Eh, I guess I'll do this real quick, but just as Common finally figured out last year with Universal Mind Control, conscious hip-hop just isn't manly (and probably never was). Ok done. Gucci Mane? Perfect... my kid's definitely collecting a harem of bitches, benjamins, and bling (when he's old enough of course). Too bad there's no pre-release in front of me.

Ok, what else... metal is pretty manly, actually (see Maddox's Alphabet of Manliness for proof), so why not the new Big Business? Coming off of a pair of impressive records and involvement with the venerable godfathers of sludge, the Melvins, this could be promising. Of all metal sub-genres, sludge is easily the most testosterone-tailored to celebrations of manhood... Except, don't expect more than one testicle's worth from the original masterminds behind Head for the Shallow. No, this isn't the soundtrack to the ape-wrestling, head-banging, womanizing sludge madness one would expect. Sheath your boners now.

Instead, Mind the Drift is an exercise in gimmickry and imitation; the post-somethings have invaded, and it seems that the Big Business trio feels a reprehensible need to co-exist. Gone is singer Jared Allen's rough edge and bassist Coady Willis' aggression, in favor of vomit-inducing clean vocals and spacey, melodic, progressive noodling. Make that inept, spacey, melodic, progressive noodling, as Toshi Kasai puts on his best impression of a prog-rock guitarist playing through a barely operable, reverb soaked Rogue combo. Explosive and just complex enough to pull off excellent drum-and-bass driven sludge as a duo, Allen, Willis, and Kasai have none of the songwriting skills or progressive acumen to pull of their goal as a trio. Mind the Drift comes off as an idiotic amalgam of three-fourths tempo Meanderthal, Mastodon for dummies, and every post-metal band in existence.

Big Business doesn't suck. On the contrary, the drumming here is superb, and there are sporadically interesting thoughts (see closer "Theme From Big Business II", a genuine stoner-rock anthem). But using Shallow and Waterworks as benchmarks, this doesn't even come close; it's glaringly obvious that the addition of a third member has wreaked havoc on the formula. There's no heterosexual nut-grinding to be had here, and I know at least one unborn infant that's crying as a result.



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3.3
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In-depth analysis of Big Business' third album, Mind the Drift...


Comments:Add a Comment 
kingsoby1
Emeritus
May 10th 2009


4950 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

this made me really sad. but it wasn't a big deal cause im having a kingsoby2

rasputin
May 10th 2009


14546 Comments


princesoby

rasputin
May 10th 2009


14546 Comments


or princess

kingsoby1
Emeritus
May 10th 2009


4950 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

i like princesoby1, i think i'll reserve it for him now for when he inevitably becomes an internet addict in the year 2022

This Message Edited On 05.10.09

scyther
May 10th 2009


1606 Comments


Soby got lizzay'd werd

kingsoby1
Emeritus
May 10th 2009


4950 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

i dont believe anyone's been laid until there's proof bro, im so elite

This Message Edited On 05.10.09

scyther
May 10th 2009


1606 Comments


Your saying one must produce offspring to prove to his friends he does in fact get the sex he boasts of?

kingsoby1
Emeritus
May 10th 2009


4950 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

yeah of course. polygamists have mad offspring

scyther
May 10th 2009


1606 Comments


Your logic is insufferable.

kingsoby1
Emeritus
May 10th 2009


4950 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

/awesome

scyther
May 10th 2009


1606 Comments


You didn't sheath your boner.

kingsoby1
Emeritus
May 10th 2009


4950 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

that's cuz Love Lockdown was on

DaveyBoy
Staff Reviewer
May 10th 2009


20857 Comments


Congrats on the news Sobhi. Not that there is anything wrong with having a little girl, but you know... Don't want the little one reviewing the 2022 version of New Kids on the Block.

jrowa001
May 10th 2009


8750 Comments


Here Come the Waterworks is a really good album imo. havent heard this one though. their first album was ok, was hoping they would continue to improve

marksellsuswallets
May 10th 2009


4848 Comments


If only the world was going to make it to 2022...

NortherlyNanook
May 10th 2009


1285 Comments


well, this is sad news

lobby
May 11th 2009


1251 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5

i remember this review on rym, I loled at the "sheath your boners" bit...

Tits McGee
May 11th 2009


1876 Comments


Never thought I'd see a Romantic type painting as a cover for a Big Business album.

KnuckleKnuts
June 11th 2009


3 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

I was massively disappointed with this album. There are some great songs offered here, but the flat production just neuters the whole affair. The bottom end lacks any kind of punch and guitar sound is just wonky. The shortcomings in the mix are furthered highlighted by the fantastic sound on the Tour III EP. Thus far, my biggest disappointment in heavy music for 2009.

lobby
September 4th 2009


1251 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5

production: flat indeed
vocals: shit

tracks 4 and 5: suprisingly good



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