Cyndi Lauper
Bring Ya To The Brink


4.5
superb

Review

by Zac USER (6 Reviews)
January 6th, 2009 | 3 replies | 3,158 views


Release Date: 2008 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Cyndi Lauper shows that reinvention doesn't necessarily mean a far throw from what you've made yours.

1 of 1 thought this review was well written

When you think Cyndi Lauper, face it, the first three things that come to mind are ‘Girls Just Want To Have Fun’, ‘Time After Time’ and ‘True Colours’. Sadly, these three attributes of Cyndi all seem to come from the first two albums. A lot of people forget that Ms Lauper has had many more albums, each with a brilliant set of songs of their own. Bring Ya To The Brink is a collection of up tempo dance floor anthems with catchy lyrics and even catchier beats. From start through until finish, Lauper delivers some of her most powerful vocals and her most sustaining music to date.

So the album kicks off with ‘Listen to the sound when you..’ before the beat sets in. High And Mighty is truly an anthem in itself. Although the chorus is repetitive, the verses create a whirl of images, ‘if I had a dollar for every time I’ve cried, I’d be living high and mighty’ all the while; the sleepy tranced beat in the background does more than enough to keep your attention. One could argue this is the weakest track on the album, whilst others could argue it’s one of the best.

When the synthesised whirs of Into The Nightlife begin, you know this is going to be one of the highlights. A relatively low vocal range of Lauper is obvious through the first verse, much different to what we’re used to, and similar to the vocals on the Sisters Of Avalon album. The vocals speak of dancing all through the night, whilst the accompanying music mimics her voice. As you listen, you can’t help but tap your foot, move your body, or sing along. She tends to have that effect more and more as you listen to the album. This track is definitely one of the highlights.

Rocking Chair brings a set of strange feelings into your mind. The vocals send you on this trippy journey through Lauper’s mind, what I expect it would be like to follow her during the creative process, yet the result is another senselessly catchy jewel in Lauper’s crown. The following song Echo is shamelessly, one of my favourites, as itunes is starting to reflect. It’s hard to pinpoint which part of the song it is I like so much, I just think the combination of the sleepy Róis*n Murphy style beat and the beauty of the lyrics Lauper executes draws the attention of the listener. ‘All my days, all my nights, standing by you’ replays in the chorus, basic, yet reiterating the meaning of the song, her life being an echo.

Lyfe, truth be told, is one of the lesser tracks on the album. The syncopated lyric plays in a juxtaposed way with the music. Don’t get me wrong, the synthesisation is effortless and very listenable, but in comparison with the following track, I think it was badly placed. Same Ol’ Story is a song of heartbreak set in time to very upbeat music. This was the official first release and took number one spot on the billboard dance 100. It’s obvious the appeal on the first listen, most definitely it stands out as one of the favourites. Sure to be an anthem for years to come.

Raging Storm and Lay Me Down are two songs, similar in appeal, placed in very good positions on the album. They both represent stories in direct conflict with the style of music, yet gain a sense of appeal as much as any other dance floor anthem. Raging Storm speaks of the mind set of a celebrity, and following your heart rather than the mind, whilst Lay Me Down communicates a want to return to the roots of her beginning. Both songs have nice meanings with, again, the sleepy synthesised feel that makes this album so very appealing.

Ok, so the next two tracks, I’ll be the first to admit, I’m in love with. Both very up tempo. Both extremely catchy, both stand outs on the album. Give It Up simply speaks of the want to follow your feet, the light beat and heavily synthesised tone colour builds in intensity with the chorus with Lauper’s vocal range getting a work out. Similarly with Set Your Heart where the four octave stretch we’ve come to know and love is demonstrated. The song features the horn line from ‘Where Are All My Friends’ by Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes and utilised to perfection in the chorus of the song. Truth be told, these two songs are most definitely two of the stand outs, both lyrically and musically.

The final two songs Grab A Hold and Rain On Me are different in their own rights. Grab A Hold follows the trail set by its two predecessors whilst Rain On Me is what could be considered a dance floor ballad. Both are beautifully executed with vocals only Lauper could utilise. To be honest, one could consider them a perfect close to a near perfect album.

Listening to Lauper reinvent herself to the dance floor is an easy task. As she has grown as an artist, so has her vocal ability. It’s plainly evident on this album that Lauper realises the trend in pop music, but refuses to fall into the mould. Her catchy lyrics and superb sense of tone colour and performing media make sure she stands tall over the rest.

ZR



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Chart.
3.5
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Comments:Add a Comment 
rasputin
January 6th 2009



14538 Comments


is this a joke

deleteriousenigma
January 6th 2009



14 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

no it's not, the album is brilliant.

Anthracks
February 14th 2009



3731 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

This is wicked good. I can possibly see my rating going up in the future (or down...which it has).

Into the Nightlife makes me dance like a SITB!!This Message Edited On 02.21.09

Digging: Devangelic - Resurrection Denied



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