Yansimalar
Yansimalar


4.5
superb

Review

by rasputin USER (196 Reviews)
December 10th, 2008 | 24 replies | 7,211 views


Release Date: 1991 | Tracklist

Review Summary: ‘Dünyanın karmaşasına karşı biraz sadelik ve huzur…’

7 of 7 thought this review was well written

We wish to convey a piece of lucidity and tranquility in contrast to the complexity of life

Yansımalar, translated as ‘Reflections’, is the collaboration of two Turkish musicians, Birol Yayla and Aziz Şenol Filiz. Fusing together traditional Turkish music with a more contemporary style, the simple chemistry between the two results in what is a wistful and ultimately beautiful piece of music, seemingly uncomplicated and effortless from the outset, but with a magnitude of depth to be uncovered within. As their first recording, Yansımalar is entirely live, with Yayla on his guitar and Filiz on the traditional reed flute, known as the ‘Ney’ in Turkish. Although Yayla plays a pivotal role in creating the backdrop upon which Filiz expands with the Ney, it is without a doubt Filiz who characterizes the beauty of Yansımalar; exemplifying the mystical and fluid surge that is traditional Turkish music, the Ney has an almost hollow sound, yet overwhelmingly shapes the album’s atmosphere. Moreover, and most importantly, the success Yayla and Filiz have in conveying various themes and moods is what really gives Yansımalar its appeal; languor aside, the grasp the two musicians have over really creating an enveloping atmosphere from the basic utilization of two instruments is astounding.

Beginning with ‘Ağıt’ (the process of mourning for the death of a loved one), we’re introduced to the simple structure that defines the album; Yayla opens by providing the foundation upon which Filiz steps on, the two then flowing in and out of various melodies and tones. The opener is quite melancholic, perhaps even a little dark, and juxtaposes superbly with the next song, ‘Yansımalar’; the title track is somewhat sanguine, a hopeful and cheery expression of nostalgia and reflection. As there is no lyrical matter to which the album can base itself on, the song titles have a very important role in helping the listener identify with the theme expressed in a particular song. ‘Göç’ (‘Migration’) is an exploratory song, adventurous in its melody while harkening back to an image of approaching the Ottoman capital of Istanbul, wooded lands on either side of the cobbled road. ‘Günışığı’ (‘The Light of the Day’), is another melancholic track, simple in theme, but extraordinarily effective. Yansımalar is a pensive album throughout its entire length, but within this contemplative climate Yayla and Filiz traverse both cheeriness and weighted gloom, more often than not in the same song. Even without any lyrics or vocal work, it’s incredibly easy to make a personal connection with the music; it is a very intimate album, and coupling this with the two men’s ability at conveying such perfect images and moods, one can lose himself easily within the music.

The undeniable ‘Turkish’ feel to Yansımalar is another important facet of its success; while being a resonantly beautiful album, the way it captures the true form of Turkish music, especially that of traditional music, is exemplary. Furthermore, asides from encapsulating a history of Turkey’s music, the image it conjures of Turkey through the ages gives it an unparalleled significance as a work of art. ‘Bir Eski Istanbul’ (‘An Old Istanbul’), in ways similar to ‘Göç’, plays on the picture of Istanbul in the past, whether it be centuries ago in the Ottoman Empire, or merely decades ago before it become the bustling metropolis it is now; the song characterizes Istanbul’s mysterious stature, its fusion of two completely different civilizations, and its somewhat mystical and heavenly aura. On that note, the album’s deeper significance comes to life with the ‘mystical’ aspect. The style of music played on Yansımalar, and more generally the Ney instrument, can be closely linked to the Mevlevi Sufi Order; the wavering and meandering melodies of the Ney are associated with the form of meditation practiced by the Mevleviye. This meditation, in actual fact a form of worship, involves the dervish (an initiate of the Mevlevi Order) twirling on the spot with his arms raised in the air, one palm facing up and the other down. This process, called the Sema, allows the dervish to reach a state of perfection, somewhat similar to the meditation practiced by Buddhists. The hands’ position is symbolic in the way it shows the dervish taking the word of God, and then with the other giving it to the people, as would be done by leaders of the order in earlier times. Yansımalar’s style is symbolic to that of this Sema process, and with each Ney note played by Filiz, the image of the whirling dervishes tantalizes the mind. The spiritual component of the album is, therefore, a very strong one, and shines through the relatively basic musical collaboration to further add to the album’s profundity.

Yansımalar, in a nutshell, is a serene and graceful album; it breathes new life into a traditionally styled form of music, and has been the inspiration for many contemporary Turkish musicians. With a modern outlook that occupies both traditional and religious history, the album explores themes as trivial as Winter’s flowers (‘Kar Çiçekleri’), and as meaningful as friendship (‘Dostluk’), all while giving a deep insight into Turkey’s musical heritage. It’s timeless and peaceful, astutely reflecting a plethora of moods, and its impact as an album remains, and will remain, undiminished.



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user ratings (2)
Chart.
4.5
superb

Comments:Add a Comment 
Zoo
December 10th 2008



3759 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Yup, review is awesomeness. I'll be listening to this in the morning. Hmm, a good album to wake up to, I imagine.

mynameischan
Staff Reviewer
December 10th 2008



17920 Comments


nice review but lol who cares about turkey!!!

rasputin
December 10th 2008



14538 Comments


good one chan

PigDestroyer89
December 10th 2008



669 Comments


nice review...pos pos pos

poweroftheweez
December 10th 2008



1290 Comments


yeah ras, sweet ass review. sweet ass.

rasputin
December 10th 2008



14538 Comments


Cheers guys. I wanted to review something different and this was the obvious choice.

PigDestroyer89
December 10th 2008



669 Comments


cheers

poweroftheweez
December 10th 2008



1290 Comments


you've successfully made this metal enough for me to want to check out.

rasputin
December 10th 2008



14538 Comments


Haha well I don't see how it's metal in any way, but you should still check it out on account of it being very good.

poweroftheweez
December 10th 2008



1290 Comments


It's metal cuz you reviewed it silly. Checking out will ensue.

rasputin
December 10th 2008



14538 Comments


Oh right, my bad.

robin
Emeritus
December 10th 2008



4247 Comments


great review man, might give this a listen.

fireaboveicebelow
December 10th 2008



6837 Comments


I need to fix my record player, then find where I put this, I'm a bit excited now

rasputin
December 10th 2008



14538 Comments


haha

Xxplosive
December 10th 2008



126 Comments


Great review, this sounds really interesting.

Zoo
December 10th 2008



3759 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

This sounds just about how I was hoping it would sound.

P13
December 10th 2008



1327 Comments


Putting it on my list, sounds really interesting. Pos

rasputin
December 10th 2008



14538 Comments



This sounds just about how I was hoping it would sound.

Awesome :D


BallsToTheWall
December 10th 2008



44164 Comments


Will listen because this sound slike something a Dead Can Dance fanboy would love. I also love Turkey. Both of them. Good work although I am having a whale of a time catching all your reviews.

rasputin
December 10th 2008



14538 Comments


Yeah, I'm on holidays so there's reviewing aplenty. Not sure how similar this would be to Dead Can Dance, but you should check it out anyway.



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