Davenport Cabinet
Nostalgia In Stereo


3.5
great

Review

by Brent Stephenson USER (67 Reviews)
November 2nd, 2008 | 14 replies | 5,752 views


Release Date: 2008 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Coheed guitarist Travis Stever delivers a nice little slice of alt. rock with a few folky touches and a sprinkling of "jam rock" for good measure...

3 of 3 thought this review was well written

With the release of their last two albums, Coheed & Cambria have become one of the most unlikely mainstream successes of this decade. In a world where nearly every successful artist releases a constant stream of songs consisting of nothing more than mindless catch phrases and abhorrently simple and recycled pop hooks, a bunch of prog-rockers from New York that craft their music around an expansive sci-fi storyline seemed like the last group that would hit it big, but hit it big they have. All of their success (including the RIAA certification of In Keeping Secrets of Silent Earth: 3 as a gold record, their third release Good Apollo Vol. 1 reaching #7 on the Billboard charts, and multiple awards from various publications such as Rock Sound) has given every member ample resources to pursue their own solo projects. Claudio Sanchez is the songwriter behind The Prizefighter Inferno, bassist Mic Todd has allegedly written material that will released at a later date, former drummer Josh Eppard fronts the alternative hip-hop project Weerd Science, and guitarist Travis Stever is involved in numerous projects including the southern metal outfit Fire Deuce, and his most recent endeavor Davenport Cabinet (formerly English Panther).

A lot of the guitar work that Stever is responsible for in Coheed is tinged with some noticeably bluesy elements, so it makes sense that Stever's solo record would find him expanding a little bit more on his blues influences. The record also draws a little from the realms of country and folk, which is most noticeable with the inclusion of the banjo, and various other acoustic instruments throughout the album. Don't be discouraged if you aren't a fan of banjo music though, as the folky instruments are rarely used by themselves, and usually do little more than create a backdrop for the guitar parts, though they do take the spotlight in a few places. What makes this album so interesting and enjoyable is the way that Stever melds all of those influences and ideas with a lot of the elements found in Coheed's music (i.e. the catchiness and slightly unconventional song structures) without making the album seem like a bunch of Coheed songs with some blues and folk elements crammed into them.

The songs on the album range from catchy mid-tempo rock songs like the title track, to bluesy instrumental jams like Square One, and slower paced ballad-esque songs like Milk Foot. Thankfully, Stever displays competent songwriting ability instead of relying to heavily on fancy fretwork, but don't worry, there are still quite a few tastefully done guitar solos on display here (the solos in Square One and Rusty Knives stand out as highlights), as well as some fairly interesting riffs. Another unexpected plus is the fact that Travis actually has a pretty decent voice. His voice has a very soothing tone to it, and a certain melodic quality that would make it feel right at home on any hard rock album from the seventies. The only problem with the album lies in the middle of the album. For some reason, most records have a tendency to sag somewhat in the middle, and sadly, this album is no different. There isn't really anything wrong with the songs themselves, they just don't measure up to the rest of the material on that populates the rest of the album.

All in all, Travis has managed to produce a thoroughly enjoyable solo album that effectively distances itself from the sound of Coheed. In fact, the album really sounds nothing like anything that Coheed has ever produced, which is something that rarely happens when members of popular bands release solo albums. So if you're a fan of guitar centric alt. rock with a little bit of bluesy flair, or if you're one of those people that needs to gobble up everything even vaguely associated with Coheed (I would include myself in both categories), I strongly suggest that you give this album a listen.



Recent reviews by this author
BATS The Sleep of ReasonCoheed and Cambria The Afterman: Ascension
Sohns Ripe/RotBaroness Yellow and Green
Red Fang Murder the MountainsGood Night & Good Morning Good Night & Good Morning
user ratings (24)
Chart.
3.3
great

Comments:Add a Comment 
marksellsuswallets
November 2nd 2008



4848 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Had this review sitting on the back-burner for a while so I decided to just go ahead and finish it up...maybe a little on the short side but I feel I said everything about the album that needed to be said...

TheStarclassicTreatment
November 2nd 2008



2910 Comments


I sorta really want this
Good review too

marksellsuswallets
November 2nd 2008



4848 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

You should sorta get it then...its pretty good mang

handoman
November 2nd 2008



2386 Comments


I've been wanting to check this out. And it sounds good enough for me. Good review, pos'd.

Acre
November 2nd 2008



847 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

I have been meaning to review this one at some point. I think this review has inspired me to offer my counterpoints...

marksellsuswallets
November 2nd 2008



4848 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

A 2? Really? Interesting...

Acre
November 3rd 2008



847 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

I give it a 2 for several reasons. First, I think the vocals are, to be blunt, bad. They are often substantially flat (and occasionally sharp), and they feel out of place in key songs. Second, the production is just dreadful. The music either feels extremely crowded and uncomfortable (chorus of Nostalgia in Stereo), or synthetic (the drums in Square One sound like goddamn MIDI drums).

The musicianship Travis displays is great as expected, but it's just undone by bad musical choices.

marksellsuswallets
November 3rd 2008



4848 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Well to be fair I don't really think spot on vocal performances are called for with the type of music on the album...I do somewhat agree about Nostalgia in Stereo though its kind of my least favorite on the album...I wouldn't exactly say the drums sound like MIDI drums but they do sound a bit synthetic...As far as the production, I'm assuming some of the songs were recorded quite a while ago, like was the case with The Prize Fighter Inferno (which featured some songs that were around 6 years old I think)

Eh, I see where you are coming from though...

Acre
November 3rd 2008



847 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

I definitely understand that spot-on vocals aren't needed to complement the music. It's just that some moments (for example, that one part in Wrecking Ball when he exclaims "It cuts like a razor...") are so disparate from the music that it causes me to cringe, and detracts from the overall quality of his musicianship.

But whatever. There are a couple good songs to be found (Rusty Knives, Thieves, Angel on the Shoulder), and I can see where you're coming from on it as well.This Message Edited On 11.03.08

benhxc
December 4th 2008



40 Comments


sounds interesting...
i'm gonna look into this

jrowa001
February 26th 2009



8750 Comments


need to get my hands on this

ianjulian
June 30th 2009



621 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

relaxing

crowing51
November 11th 2010



3446 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

I listen to this allot when i play WoW

DinosaurJones
May 17th 2013



490 Comments

Album Rating: 2.5

I want to like this more, but Travis' vocals just piss me off.



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2013 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy