She Wants Revenge
This is Forever


2.0
poor

Review

by The Katz brothers USER (183 Reviews)
October 12th, 2007 | 15 replies | 60,611 views


Release Date: 2007 | Tracklist

Review Summary: While most seem to be distancing themselves from the 80's (see: Killers, Bravery), She Wants Revenge release another Joy Division embracing stinker.

Let’s face it, She Wants Revenge showed up a little late to the Post-Punk/Goth revival party to begin with. Released almost 4 years after Interpol, a band that SWR arguably owe their whole career to, made their Matador debut, She Wants Revenge already felt a bit stale. However stale is forgivable when your album contains a track like Tear You Apart , Revenge’s sinister, surprisingly catchy first single. It’s been about two years since the duo released their self-titled debut, and, where that record was a bit out of date already, This is Forever is encrusted in a thick coat of mold, dust and bass synthesizers.

The space between She Wants Revenge’s two albums found groups like The Killers, who found success in the form of Americana, and The Bravery, who didn’t find much success at all, attempting to distance themselves from the 80’s. She Wants Revenge, on the other hand, have stayed true to their roots: This is Forever is just as electronic heavy as its predecessor. Tracks like Written in Blood (which makes cringe-worthy use of cowbell) are still driven by speaker rattling bass and dancey beats. What I Want is a bit more organic, relying heavily on electric guitar and real bass. The verses’ multi-tracked, semi-rapped vocals and sparse arrangement give off a bit of Hip Hop feel, though the chorus brings back the homogenized mixture of all things influenced by Joy Division. Neither of these styles are particularly new territory for the duo, both of whom used to be involved in Hip Hop music. Of course, nothing on This is Forever is really new territory; the 80’s influenced synthesizers, the electronic drums, the monotone vocalist, it’s all been heard before. It’s all been done so much better.

Throughout the 11 songs that his baritone is present on (Opener First, Love and atmospheric second to last track All Those Moments are without vocals), vocalist Justin Warfield is invariably either describing a woman’s actions or some kind of break-up in morbid detail. Customarily he will throw in a line or two about violence or insanity, just to make things a bit darker. On Replacement , a crazy ex-lover begs for the singer’s return, as Warfield puts it “it started as an honest attraction/began under the guise of a flirt/Till you were screaming at the edge of the bed,/"Nobody moves, nobody gets hurt!”. Lead single True Romance sees the tides being turned. This time Warfield has been played, his woman hasn’t ever loved him, hasn’t ever cared at all. The album’s overtly gloomy lyrics may have appeal but they’re also terribly cliché and uninspired at points. She Wants Revenge are both lyrically and musically at their best on She Will Always Be a Broken Girl , its lyrics paint a vivid picture of self-esteem drained girl overtop the album’s best synth line. During the track’s ending chant, Warfield ditches the Ian Curtis imitation, his voice going a bit out of tune as it reaches into its higher ranges. This is really one of the only moments on the album where he truly breaks form.

Even on the piano and synthesized string heavy It’s Just Begun , a tender ballad when compared the coldness of the songs that surround it, Warfield’s voice is nearly void of emotion. Still, the change of pace alone makes this track a standout. This is Forever is simply too boring, too unoriginal and too, well, bad to warrant any kind of really good review. The album, like its predecessor, has some good moments, but when your band is so similar to its influences, you’ve got to do a little bit better than one or two standout tracks. Sorry, She Wants Revenge, but when I want synth-heavy Post-Punk/Goth/Dark Wave/Whatever, there are dozens of acts I’d rather hear. This is Forever, thankfully contradicting its moniker, ends on Rachael . Rachael, named for its questioning lead character, is a good track to end with, one of the better songs on the album. It’s pretty heavy, catchy and still just as gloomy as ever. I’d go into more detail, but I’d just end up repeating myself. The word ‘dark’ doesn’t have that many synonyms. Neither does ‘average’.

-Dan



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user ratings (39)
Chart.
3.1
good

Comments:Add a Comment 
pulseczar
October 12th 2007



2385 Comments


This band sucks. A few of their videos used get played a few years ago on tv, and, along with the bravery, were easily the most shamelessly unoriginal bands of that post-punk rip-off era. Junglin good review as usual

Tyler
Emeritus
October 12th 2007



7926 Comments


I have never heard this band.

jrowa001
October 12th 2007



8750 Comments


im sure youve heard of their song "Tear You Apart" Cocaine. it was a big radio hit. i used to like them a bit but then i kind of just lost any interest in them. i might give this a listen

The Jungler
October 12th 2007



4827 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

[quote=pulse]Junglin good[/quote]what a great phrase.
[quote=plath]ps did you get your promo copy of this?[/quote]Not yet, I didn't really want to wait for it. I hope I still get it though, it'd be nice.
Thanks for the compliments.

Tyler
Emeritus
October 12th 2007



7926 Comments


im sure youve heard of their song "Tear You Apart" Cocaine. it was a big radio hit. i used to like them a bit but then i kind of just lost any interest in them. i might give this a listen

just youtubed it. I hadnt heard it until now. Wish i could have kept it that way. Thanks.

jrowa001
October 12th 2007



8750 Comments


oh lol my bad

Electric City
Staff Reviewer
October 12th 2007



15732 Comments


What an awful band. I thought the lead single was a Killers track at first.

Two-Headed Boy
October 13th 2007



4527 Comments


That closing line there is fantastic.

Meatplow
October 13th 2007



5524 Comments


I've heard of Justin Warfield from "Bug Powder Dust" by Bomb The Bass.

JAD
October 14th 2007



200 Comments


The last line was really great, awesome review.This Message Edited On 10.14.07

Iluvatar
Staff Reviewer
October 14th 2007



16083 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

Their first album had a few good tunes to balance out the blandness, but this just sucks through and through.

colemancb
October 15th 2007



9 Comments


This band had a 'wow' factor for me when their album was released, but I got bored with it, and this is the exact same thing (minus the WOW factor). I wish they would have tried something at least a little different. GREAT review!This Message Edited On 10.15.07

Suckacock
November 3rd 2007



1 Comments


Fuck You.

That is all I really need to say.

The Killers are sell out fags. Brandon Flowers is a total prick with no respect for any band other than his own. Maybe if he gave two shits about anyone other than himself, The Bravery would be a lot bigger now. He destroyed their reputation by being his prick self and bitching about them.
Now given that SWR is an amazing band with great stage presence and shows they really don't need fags like you to care about their music.

Jog on cockgoblins.

Jips
November 30th 2010



1129 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

I know these guys are extremely derivative, but im also a fan of were they came from...and i can really dig this band from time to time...



Graveyard
April 2nd 2012



5706 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

I don't get all the comparisons to Joy Division when it comes to this band

They don't sound nothing alike

Digging: Total Control - Typical System



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