Rammstein
Sehnsucht


4.0
excellent

Review

by Clumpy USER (29 Reviews)
July 7th, 2007 | 9 replies | 3,014 views


Release Date: 1998 | Tracklist

Review Summary: SchputnikMusickenDotKommen

1 of 1 thought this review was well written

NOTE: This review has been significantly amended by the author on 14 Jan 2007 to fix certain inaccuracies and some bad writing that has been bugging him - me - ever since. --- Clumpy


"[The] German language suits heavy metal music. French might be the language of love, but German is the language of anger." - Oliver Riedel. Bassist, Rammstein

After more than a decade, Rammstein's sophomore LP still represents Tanz-Metall at its finest. Sehnsucht is dark, fast and epic (and above all, highly, highly listenable). The best elements of the album are the same aspects likely to alienate potential fans - sinister, growling German vocals and mechanical, plodding riffs. These are the exact elements, we might add, that attracted us (and millions of other fans) to Rammstein in the first place.

Rammstein ventures far from the atonal dredge that is much metal music, making a point to infuse melody (often glorious, epic melody) into every track. The sound is clean and never sludgy, the synthesizers lilting and angelic. Former almost-Olympic swimmer Till Lindemann's gruff vocals couldn't possibly fit a non-NDH band, but here they work beautifully - equal parts sinister and passionate. Lindemann's vocal range is impressive - though Lindemann plods through most of the songs with his trademark guttural gnarl, he proves himself quite a crooner on some of the later tracks (listeners interested in this side of Rammstein would do well to check out "Mutter", the less-immediate but more rewarding followup to "Sehnsucht"). Lindemann isn't a Serj Tankian-style versatilist, but his vocals contribute well and lend the songs their sense of urgency.

"Sehnsucht" works best when it presses its electronic elements - at the surface, the album plods along with machine-gun intensity, but the electronic slides and burbles work under the surface, giving the album depth and subtlety. The best moments of this album are the lighter ones - when the deep guitars and light, euphonious synths are forced to reconcile during the chorus of "Engel", or when Lindemann gives way to the wonderful female vocals of the same song.

Nearly ever track on Sehnsucht paints the same picture and possesses many of the same elements: gruff, serious uberdeep German vocals, wallshaking riffs, and sophisticated electronic doodickery. The method is in the madness - Rammstein make a big show of being unhinged, but they know their craft and execute it well.

Sure, some of the songs consist of one riff repeated ad infinitum, and the chorus is often merely the song's title growled over and over again, but that's not really an issue. Rammstein's focus was obviously to release a danceable, immediate record, and that they've done well, to the extent that I still consider Sehnsucht something of a classic.

This band shamely plays up German stereotypes - blond, muscular fetishists who light pyrotechnics on stage and issue harsh, punishing commands - an image few are seriously buying. Whether you think their image is rubbish or not, it's hard to fault the music. Sehnsucht is neither art nor dreck. Having said that, it is plenty innovative and listenable. Though Rammstein knows that in practice you will catch more flies with vinegar than honey, they don't neglect their sweeter elements.

"Sehnsucht" is a guilty pleasure, but no doubt it's a great one.

---
Thanks for reading.
Clumpy's blog : http://clumpy.blogspot.com
---



Recent reviews by this author
Man Man Six Demon BagArctic Monkeys Favourite Worst Nightmare
Battles MirroredBelle and Sebastian The Life Pursuit
Eels Electro-Shock BluesGorillaz Demon Days
user ratings (785)
Chart.
3.8
excellent
other reviews of this album
Psyclone (4.5)
A great, hard-hitting album. You can see why this band is classified as "Dance Metal" with this albu...

Till_Lindeman001 (4)
...


Comments:Add a Comment 
EyesWideShut
July 8th 2007



3098 Comments


Pretty good album but after some time its hard not to get bored with Rammstein. Tough to choose which is better Sehnsucht or Mutter ?This Message Edited On 07.08.07

Altmer
July 8th 2007



5652 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Mutter imo. I like Rammstein's new, more melodic side more than their Techno days, but this is indeed a pretty awesome album.

Engel is awesome, so is Du Hast, and Klavier is killer as well. Kuss Mich (Fellfrosch) is a bit weird though.

ValiumMan
July 8th 2007



493 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Quite frankly, I didn't really like your review. Too much about how your friends hate Rammstein and too little about the music.

kalkal50
July 8th 2007



2386 Comments


OK review but it was a bit awkward quite frankly. You made a huge deal out of your choice of music.

Dethtrasher
July 8th 2007



2211 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

This album is horrible, Mutter is their best work imo. Bestrafe Mich is the only track that I like (or liked) from this album.

Neoteric
July 8th 2007



3243 Comments


CLUMPY?

Bloody hell, it´s been a long time.

Clumpy
July 8th 2007



76 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Hey, Neo.

It was probably a mistake to write the review while I was actually listening to the album. I know it's kind of a gimmicky review. I don't think the personal stuff was really a mistake to include, but I definitely need to write a little more about the album tomorrow. I'll see what would be beneficial to include.

Dimmu Burger
July 11th 2007



81 Comments


I love the riffs on this album. #2 best riffs album behind Metallica's ...And Justice For All.

VolumeofRevolution
April 8th 2009



6 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

I kind of like Rammstein's Tanzmetal days. Mutter was good but this album will always get you dancing.



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2013 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy