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Old 06-12-2010, 12:28 AM   #91
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these are just some suggested edits to SeaAnemone's latest review

Quote:
It’s funny how the passing of time has the power to change music so distinctly. Of course, I make it no secret that I’m partial to music that’s managed to remain untouched by the pitiless effects of aging. The directness of a first impression, rarely clouded with uncertainty or ambiguity, is seductive when approaching an album. It’s difficult, however, to retain steadfast assertions after years of listening because my ears tend to register mixed feelings. Conflicts begin to arise, as the lingering ghosts of past opinions haunt the living doubts that gather as soon as I start to recognize an album’s flaws.

And yet, for all this, some albums age so gracefully. Jawbox’s For Your Own Special Sweetheart is a stunning example of the ability of some music to stand up to the caustic gaze of retrospection. Even at the time, what could have gone down as an utter failure turned out to brashly prove doubters and purists wrong. The cards were stacked against Jawbox. Making the jump from hardcore-royalty Dischord to big-name mainstream Atlantic Records could very well have been the musical equivalent of the BP oil spill. Rather, For Your Own Special Sweetheart avoided these pitfalls, and has since aged into something even more beautiful, a balancing act of epic proportions. Catchy but dissonant, both furious and fun, Jawbox’s opus is a testament to the blending of distinct cultures and styles to create something unquestionably unique yet unapologetically familiar.

For Your Own Special Sweetheart’s beauty lies not in the separate elements it borrows from traditional hardcore or alternative music, but instead in the band’s expertise in harmonizing these various aspects. Jawbox succeed in creating a work that will always be regarded as the innovative source of new influence rather than the derivative sum of its own influences. The flawless execution and combination of chunky riffs a la twin guitars, punchy, pummeling percussion, J. Robbins’ bare, clean vocals, and Kim Coletta’s skeletal bass-lines are irreconcilably ferocious and focused, sending chills down both the spines of distraught Dischord fans and a new, larger audience alike. Sweetheart’s real specialty, though, prevails in Jawbox’s ability to render notions like “harmony” and “dissonance” futile as descriptors, synchronizing the two together to the brink of discomfort in the band’s exhilarating and profound third full-length. Dually beautiful and melancholic, Sweetheart attains extraordinary levels of elegance through their tight, restrained, and disarmingly simple post-hardcore anthems like “FF=66,” “Savory,” “Cooling Card,” among a host of others. Instead of drowning itself in pressure and significance, the music feels unabashedly fun throughout, and paradoxically becomes all the more significant because of it. Simple aspects like Robbins’ vocal lines are seamlessly forged together with complexities like the ever-shifting guitars and shaky reverb, and manage never to lose a bit of personality and charisma in the process. As time goes by, the record becomes inevitably worn, and detail after detail of the album are extrapolated, yet the charm of Sweetheart’s intimacy is never diminished. The controversy once surrounding Jawbox’s “sell-out” to a major label has become laughably trivial as a decade and a half has shown that for Jawbox the real fervor lies in the unrelenting ferocity of the album, not which label released it.

Legions of post-hardcore and non-post-hardcore alike have cited Jawbox as a major influence in their music. Some have proven themselves worthy of the influence, while others not so much. Once again, this fact serves as another testament to Time’s kind enhancement of Sweetheart. The hazy pinkish woman underneath the “Jawbox” on the cover has morphed into somewhat of a symbol for me. The clashing elements that define the cover in dazzling manner (not unlike the music itself) remind me of time’s powerful effect on art and it’s ability to make Sweetheart the irrevocable classic that it remains today; not through an immediate likability (though it does have that), but rather through the timelessness of the sound-clash between hardcore aesthetics and alt-rock tendencies that Jawbox claimed for themselves.

The immaculate bending of original cultures and sounds that birthed Sweetheart are somewhat lost in the process of the album’s conception, but looking back on how Sweetheart’s fared over the many years it’s impossible to mourn this loss. Instead, celebrate the new, sensational movement born out of the raucous chord changes and furious riffage that inhabit the album. As Sweetheart begins to unwind itself over time, year after year, listen after listen, a magnificent album is slowly revealed. It’s been a while since Jawbox’s most heralded and controversial album was released. In comparison, as years surely pass and some of this year’s now-exalted albums are bound to fall behind bookshelves to be forgotten, time will surely take vengeance on the undeserving recipients of today’s praises, claiming them only ephemeral masterpieces. But time has spoken- balancing tension and dissonance with masterful restraint and an air free of pretension rarely manages to sound half as magnificent as For Your Own Special Sweetheart, and it’s pretty clear what Time’s verdict is on the album.
it's a great review, and i love the problem you're articulating, but i just had a problem with a little of the structure and one of the metaphors you used

if you'd want to use any of it, reenter some of the italics and whatnot

Last edited by MichaelJordan; 06-12-2010 at 12:37 AM.
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Old 06-12-2010, 09:17 PM   #92
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Lil B - Roses Exodus Review

If anybody would like to proof my review for Lil B's "Roses Exodus" before I submit it, that would be great.

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Brandon McCartney - or as we best know him, Lil B - is a godfather unaccredited and unrecognized.In 2005, the rapper from Berkeley, California blew up alongside his The Pack groupmates with the hit single “Vans”. The catchy ode to the brand of skating shoe was insanely popular, and was a catalyst that helped spark up the dance/snap rap movement that is still alive and well today. But just as fast as they rose, they fell, and Lil B went with them. Through the years, dance rap artists and their hits came and went, and in the meantime, Lil B and his bandmates were nowhere to be found, but recently, that’s all changed. Lil B has exploded in the last few months; he’s tight with Soulja Boy, he’s garnered blogs’ worth of devoted fans and 31,000+ followers on Twitter, and he’s simultaneously revered and despised. But right now, he’s one of the best rappers in the game, and you can bet your *** I mean that. On the off chance you know Lil B as a solo artist, you probably know him for his “b*tches suck my d*ck ‘cause I look like ____” line, being sucker punched during an interview, and/or that one “f*ck Justin Bieber, I’m Hannah Montana” song. You may think he’s your typical mainstream idiot-rapper, but with Roses Exodus you can take everything you thought you knew about Lil B (and perhaps even hip-hop) and throw it out the window.

On Roses Exodus, we find a Lil B far removed from his fun, trademarked based raps where he can be heard hilariously referring to himself as a lesbian, bragging about ejaculating into a woman’s hair, and rapping about other outlandish things of the sort. No, here we find a morally inquisitive and intellectually charged Based God that is sure to please even those who find some of his choice lyrics to be ridiculous, offensive, and amateur. Sure, he occasionally delves into discussing his purported rescue of hip-hop from certain peril, but largely, Lil B can be found introspectively musing, uttering eccentric metaphors, and conveying disappointment in humanity. On “Sun and Snow (Remix)” he portrays humans as creatures of selfish nature through an almost vegan stance, stating that humans are wrong for thinking it’s acceptable to kill another animal and eat it, and even wrong to think it’s okay to because they think they’re better. Through sentiments like this, Lil B proves himself to be a legitimate gentle soul, a pleasing rarity in a time in which rappers involve themselves in hyper-masculine posturing and billionaire lifestyle bravado. Although Lil B may seem to leave some thoughts incomplete, and thusly, seem stupid, he’s actually creating room for interpretation. A fill-in-the-blank attitude is somewhat adopted throughout the record, and it makes for a more engaging album which at times can seem like a little puzzle.

Never one to conform, Lil B’s flow throughout his solo career always defied the typical AABB…hip-hop delivery, but on Roses Exodus, his flow is exceptionally bizarre. Rather than steadily streaming, Lil B pops in and out of the songs to dictate his based poetry throughout the course of the record. But the manner in which he presents those lyrics is truly what makes this album work. His delivery is other-worldly and his voice is dipped in raw passion. He recites his lyrics as if he had his head in the clouds and, unlike many rappers, sounds like he actually cares.

To compliment his dazed mindset, Lil B crafts a wonderfully atmospheric set of beats. A beautifully textured, distinctive combination of ambient and IDM, the production is perfect for Lil B’s dreamy demeanor and disappearing and reappearing vocals. Instrumentals range from trippy and psychedelic (the sharp, operatic strings, oozy, whirring synths, and slimy, boinging bass guitar on “Truth and War” change decibel frequencies just like Lil B changes vocal tempos) to beautiful and dark (the gentle acoustic noodling and thundering, menacing organs of “Sun and Snow (Remix)” make for a pretty, but black track), and Lil B sounds fantastic over everything.

But what’s most surprising (for those who are familiar with Lil B) is that Roses Exodus is Lil B’s most accessible record. Despite its quirkiness, it’s way more cohesive than Lil B’s other albums, which are just sloppy (but good) compilations of previously released YouTube material. Moreover, Lil B is sincere, thoughtful, and pure, something many, many rappers cannot claim to be. After all, who wears the same pair of Vans for four years rather than brand-spanking-new Jordans? Who dons African bead necklaces rather than diamond-encrusted chains? Who tweets good wishes to their fans and their fans’ families on an early, early Saturday morning when most rappers are downing shots and courting women? Lil B, that’s who, and if you think Lil B sucks, Roses Exodus will stop you in your tracks, and make you say, “Damn, I was wrong.”
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Old 06-20-2010, 01:12 AM   #93
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Just the intro paragraph so far but I'd like some feedback if anyone is kind enough to take a gander

On all accounts Heinali & Matt Finney's first 2010 EP Town Line was a somber affair; to match the scathing political war commentary of spoken word artist Mathew Finney, (of ambient/experimental duo Finneyerkes) Ukrainian born and self taught ambient composer Heinali provided bountiful amounts of diverse symphonic textures, all to truly heartbreaking degrees. Despite it's deceptively pleasant name, the pair's second 2010 EP entitled Lemonade sees Finney getting dangerously personal-- with himself. And all to the backdrop of a beautifully bleak ambient soundscape.
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Old 06-24-2010, 08:56 AM   #94
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Once again the intro paragraph for an upcoming review for the Peaking Lights 'Imaginary Falcons' (rating is 4 and genre of group is ambient/noise/indie-pop/reggae)

Funnily enough, when the decision of writing this review popped into my head, i had an introduction in mind, that went a little something like this; "There is no doubt in my mind that upon recording their 2009 opus Imaginary Falcons, the dynamic duo team of Indra Dunis and Aaron Coyes were completely and utterly baked". Now looking at their Myspace page I find my statement may be more accurate then one would expect; this husband and wife team may just be the greatest hippies to exist in the modern world. Everything from their pictures (the pair strictly don 70's approved apparel), to their psychedelic logo, to even their cutesy quote that simple states "STAY HIGH" implies that these two do quite a bit of smoking the ganja plant. And it is probably due to this that Imaginary Falcons is such a fantastic record; the album is audible weed, causing you to drift, starve and sleep to the swooning melodies that inhabit the disc.
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Old 06-27-2010, 01:37 PM   #95
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Is there a guide to what needs to be included in a review? I want to start writing reviews, but I'm afraid they won't be any good.
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:37 AM   #96
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MJ:

If you think about it, Circle Takes the Square's As the Roots Undo is a composition built off several metaphors, such as the beginning of "Non-Objective Portrait of Karma," where crescendoing ambience seems to represent an unnamed character's ascension to heaven. From there on, discordance ensues, representing the mutiny he causes, and the coup d'etat he is subject to. On "Crowquill," foreshadowing occurs, referencing a threnody ("A Crater to Cough In," which is, unsurprisingly, about death) and this very overthrow ("nothing's so puerile as haiku d'etat," perhaps another way to say "actions speak louder than words"). Similarly, the short introduction track seems to present the birth of an idea, before moving on into a chaotic display of hilariously charismatic- or, perhaps, egotistic - emo.

Yes, it becomes quite clear that in terms of this record's conception, lyrics are unusually important, but here is where one of the largest errors lies; As the Roots Undo's lyrical focus, while full of potential, is bogged down by poor execution. Lines ramble and interrupt with little to no connection to the next, and while many could argue that this is simply an inventive way of incorporating political and theistic philosophy, it comes across as sloppy pretense. "Same Shade as Concrete" and "Crowquill" are, overall, the worst offenders, but that doesn't keep tracks like "Interview at the Ruins" from following their coattails. Any sort of simplicity is thrown out the window, but not in a way that makes allegory seem interesting or intelligent. You can tell when the band is preaching politics and contemplating religion; they take a Randian method, using color to symbolize the personality of a person, concept, or thing; and finally, they preach the infamous cliché: we are all perfectly imperfect, as perfection is an abstract concept, achievable by one but not all.

The story behind the album is equally as generic, but, okay, I'll bite; it's got potential to shine as a grand, layered tale, following the story of an unnamed character who commits suicide to find out if there is an afterlife. Once he discovers that the rumors are, indeed, true, he plans a revolt against God, becomes God, promises to make a perfect Heaven, and is overthrown by an upset resistance group, dying to the soundtrack of the overlong "A Crater to Cough In." However, the banalities are numerous, switching between this theme and that without any sort of coherency or reason, switching between days of old and new without care, even interrupting lines with other uncorrelated pieces of easily-decipherable puzzles. They approach "In the Nervous Light of Sunday" with the same nihilism as the grinding axes portray; "Kill the Switch" tries to add as many new elements to the story line and the album's ethos, ending up convoluted and technically mediocre.

But then again, these are al metaphors for Circle Takes the Square's sound; coincidentally, the worst lyrics pop up just as the worst instrumentals begin. "Let the flood swell; it's God's will; let the flood swell," comes across on "Same Shade as Concrete" after other genera die out. Thudding bass and sing-screams intertwine as Kathy Coppola and Drew Speziale spout out lyrics. But hey, it's better than "wade in the water, wade. Come and fill your lungs," right? Right, so embrace what you have, like the few well-executed hardcore aspects of the song, all completely forgotten when the dreadful "Crowquill" comes around, but they're present.

Be glad for it, too, because Circle Takes the Square are best when they work with ambience and its polar opposite, an abrasive hardcore style. However, they seem to be more concerned with haphazard syncretism than focusing on their strengths, a feature which both hinders the album and douses it in pretense. "Interview at the Ruins" is easily the least affected, but its beginning is laughable, showing As the Roots Undo's hilarious over-baked ideas. The minimalist eccentricities on said track are burnt to an ultra-boring crisp, but at least the track uses dynamics well.
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:39 AM   #97
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The fourth paragraph might need some work. Maybe an inclusion of the sentence "Their execution seems to reflect the lyrics, incoherent, pretentious clitter-clatter." or something somewhere.
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:46 AM   #98
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Ugh not another CTTS review
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:52 AM   #99
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ok reading this now. and if you're not going to help with the editing Slum shut the fuck up. seriously i don't see how anyone can "get sick of" these reviews. no one is forcing you to keep clicking on them and reading them
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:52 AM   #100
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Probs only posting it in a thread. not a formal review, but more of an excercise/vent.
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:52 AM   #101
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but yeah vermeer does have a point. you don't have to read anything.
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:54 AM   #102
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When the whole site in entrenched in it, and I enjoy visiting the site, it's kind of hard to ignore it.
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Old 07-10-2010, 01:57 AM   #103
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I can get that, but the most that have ever appeared on a front page at a time were four, and those were promptly moved from the page.
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:06 AM   #104
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The discussion was still insane for a few weeks and having it spark up again would be not only unnecessary, but just annoying. Anyway I didn't mean to come off malicious as I apparently did, and this probably isn't the place to talk about it so I'm done.
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:12 AM   #105
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k mang you still are sort of my friend even though you like music i hate and remind me of a smaller-penis'd observer. :}
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:12 AM   #106
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My penis is indeed small.
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:18 AM   #107
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ok reading this now. and if you're not going to help with the editing Slum shut the fuck up. seriously i don't see how anyone can "get sick of" these reviews. no one is forcing you to keep clicking on them and reading them
no, he's right. this isn't even reviewing anymore. it's just writing-and-polishing-and-rewriting the same mindless perspective... what's sad is that this is basically the same bullshit that prompted MJ's first review, just from a negative opinion...
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:19 AM   #108
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The first step for it to grow is you must take Drew Speziale's organic male enhancement products











































































































made with kale and anthrax spores
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:20 AM   #109
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Quote:
If you think about it, Circle Takes the Square's As the Roots Undo is a composition built off several metaphors, such as the beginning of "Non-Objective Portrait of Karma," where crescendoing ambience seems to represent an unnamed character's ascension to heaven. From there on, discord ensues, representing the mutiny he causes, and the coup d'etat he is subject to. On "Crowquill," foreshadowing occurs, referencing a threnody ("A Crater to Cough In," which is, unsurprisingly, about death) and this very overthrow ("nothing's so puerile as haiku d'etat," perhaps another way to say "actions speak louder than words"). Similarly, the short introduction track seems to present the birth of an idea, before moving on into a chaotic display of hilariously charismatic - or, perhaps, egotistical - emo.

Yes, it becomes quite clear that in terms of this record's conception, lyrics are unusually important. But here is where one of the largest errors lies: As the Roots Undo's lyrical focus, while full of potential, is bogged down by poor execution. Lines ramble and interrupt one another with little or no connection to what comes next, and while many could argue that this is simply an inventive way of incorporating political and theistic philosophy, it comes across as sloppy pretense. "Same Shade as Concrete" and "Crowquill" are, overall, the worst offenders, but that doesn't keep tracks like "Interview at the Ruins" from following on their coattails. Any sort of simplicity is thrown out the window, but not in a way that makes allegory seem interesting or intelligent. You can tell when the band is preaching politics and contemplating religion; they take a Randian method, using color to symbolize the personality of a person, concept, or thing; and finally, they preach the infamous cliché: we are all perfectly imperfect, as perfection is an abstract concept, achievable by one but not all.

The story behind the album is equally as generic, but, okay, I'll bite. In some sense, it's got potential to shine as a grand, layered tale, following the story of an unnamed character who commits suicide to find out if there is an afterlife. Once he discovers that the rumors are, indeed, true, he plans a revolt against God, becomes God, promises to make a perfect Heaven, and is overthrown by an upset resistance group, dying to the soundtrack of the overlong "A Crater to Cough In." However, the banalities are numerous, switching between this theme and that without any sort of coherence or reason, switching between days of old and new without care, even interrupting lines with other uncorrelated pieces of easily-decipherable puzzles. They approach "In the Nervous Light of Sunday" with the same nihilism as the grinding axes portray; "Kill the Switch" tries to add as many new elements to the story line and the album's ethos, ending up convoluted and technically mediocre.

But then again, these are al metaphors for Circle Takes the Square's sound; coincidentally, the worst lyrics pop up just as the worst instrumentals begin. "Let the flood swell; it's God's will; let the flood swell," comes across on "Same Shade as Concrete" after other genera die out. Thudding bass and sing-screams intertwine as Kathy Coppola and Drew Speziale spout out lyrics. But hey, it's better than "wade in the water, wade. Come and fill your lungs," right? Right, so embrace what you have, like the few well-executed hardcore aspects of the song, all of which are completely forgotten when the dreadful "Crowquill" comes around, but they're present.

Be glad for it, too, because Circle Takes the Square are best when they work with ambience and its polar opposite, an abrasive hardcore style. However, they seem to be more concerned with achieving a haphazard syncretism than focusing on their strengths, a feature which both hinders the album and douses it in pretense. "Interview at the Ruins" is easily the least affected, but its beginning is laughable, showing As the Roots Undo's hilarious over-baked ideas. The minimalist eccentricities on this track are burnt to an ultra-boring crisp, but at least the track uses dynamics well.
ok this is with some edits here and there. looks good so far. i've heard of this interpretation of the album's lyrics before. if it's indeed accurate (which it might well be), it's loaded with cheap theologico-philosophical themes. the mutiny against God by Lucifer and the other angels in the Bible and in Milton, the idea of murdering God and taking His place in Nietzsche. it's just a messy smattering of cliched ideas drawn from countless glib readings of world literature
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:31 AM   #110
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no, he's right. this isn't even reviewing anymore. it's just writing-and-polishing-and-rewriting the same mindless perspective... what's sad is that this is basically the same bullpoop that prompted MJ's first review, just from a negative opinion...
nah our reviews really don't have that much in common. the lyrics on the record are terrible so it would make sense that everyone would complain about them

i mention once toward the end of my review that i think the album is syncretistic, but don't really develop this critique as much as i do the others. Bitchfork really expands upon it in detail. and he has a different interpretation of the lyrics. i pretty much just took Drew Speziale at his word when he said the album's concept was just self-development

seriously just don't click on the review if you don't want to get upset by it
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Old 07-10-2010, 02:45 AM   #111
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Originally Posted by Bitchfork View Post
You can tell when the band is preaching politics and contemplating religion; they take a Randian method, using color to symbolize the personality of a person, concept, or thing; and finally, they preach the infamous cliché: we are all perfectly imperfect, as perfection is an abstract concept, achievable by one but not all.
this is one of the ugliest F**King sentences i have ever laid my kind eyes upon. what the hell, man? Try reading this out loud. How many breaths does it take you to finish? yeah, that's a bad sign...

also, look up what the proper usage of a semicolon is (hint: there should only be one in this sentence)


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The story behind the album is equally as generic, but, okay, I'll bite; it's got potential to shine as a grand, layered tale, following the story of an unnamed character who commits suicide to find out if there is an afterlife.
seriously, why the F**K is a semicolon here. Lets break this piece of sh1t down to its parts. (Perspective, subject)
1. The story behind this album is equally as generic (third person, the story)
2. but, okay, I'll bite (first person, writer)
--------------------------why have you not ended the sentence yet?---------------
3. it's got potential to shine as a grand, layered tale (back to third person, the story) following the story (why are you using 'the story' again? this sounds redundant) of an unnamed character (tough to believe someone could write this impressive a run-on) who commits suicide (is there more?) to find out (yes, there's more) if there is an afterlife

and, for the record, how the hell does this retardation qualify as generic? bad pseudophilosophy is bad pseudophilosophy, but it's not like this type of crap permeates so many albums that it counts as 'generic'? where the hell do you live that your generic, manufactured radio music includes allegorical deicide?

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seriously just don't click on the review if you don't want to get upset by it
who's upset? im just cluing you in. you're review is a lifetime movie.

Last edited by uhhhkris; 07-10-2010 at 02:48 AM.
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Old 07-10-2010, 03:03 AM   #112
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uhhhkris wrote:
you're review is a lifetime movie.
such irony that this hilariously obvious mistake would appear in something that's meant to be overly critical of another person's writing

and this retarded pseudophilosophy is fairly generic within the screamo genre. Saetia and City of Caterpillar attempt the same thing, even if the result with them isn't half as overblown as it is with CTtS
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Old 07-10-2010, 03:17 AM   #113
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I'm also going to touch upon how parts of their hardcore sound and their post-rock sound either sound like city tributes without the finesse or the power they had. and i'm going to definitely complain about how the concepts of the album musically are completely flawed. i understand you don't understand the hardcore theory as much as i do. so why not make full advantage of it.


although stylus's review for this kills.
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Old 07-10-2010, 03:38 AM   #114
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such irony that this hilariously obvious mistake would appear in something that's meant to be overly critical of another person's writing

and this retarded pseudophilosophy is fairly generic within the screamo genre. Saetia and City of Caterpillar attempt the same thing, even if the result with them isn't half as overblown as it is with CTtS
i like coc. but suffocate for ****'s sake is a much more diverse, post-rock driven group, so perhaps my argument about their lack of dynamics will be related to them, even if its a less-popular artist?
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Old 07-10-2010, 03:47 AM   #115
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such irony that this hilariously obvious mistake would appear in something that's meant to be overly critical of another person's writing

wtf? what mistake? must not be so 'hilariously obvious'...(?)

the only mistake i see is that you forgot the 't' in "overtly"

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Old 07-10-2010, 08:37 AM   #116
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you're and your

learn the difference faggot
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Old 07-10-2010, 09:24 AM   #117
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uhhhkris wrote:
wtf? what mistake? must not be so 'hilariously obvious'...(?)

the only mistake i see is that you forgot the 't' in "overtly"
yeah i suppose i should qualify that statement. it's only "hilariously obvious" to someone who knows the difference between a copular contraction ("you are" = "you're") and a possessive pronoun ("something belonging to you" = "your"). and i guess you would really only know that difference if you'd passed fourth grade English

also "overly" is a word. and it's the word i meant, not "overtly"
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Old 07-10-2010, 09:52 AM   #118
uhhhkris
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yeah i suppose i should qualify that statement. it's only "hilariously obvious" to someone who knows the difference between a copular contraction ("you are" = "you're") and a possessive pronoun ("something belonging to you" = "your"). and i guess you would really only know that difference if you'd passed fourth grade English

also "overly" is a word. and it's the word i meant, not "overtly"

sooo owned there. wowzers. But alas, i was not being overly critical. Semicolon abuse is a serious problem. Especially on sputnik.
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Old 07-10-2010, 10:07 AM   #119
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sooo owned there. wowzers. But alas, i was not being overly critical. Semicolon abuse is a serious problem. Especially on sputnik.
well yeah this is true. the formatting for reviews doesn't allow people to use em-dashes though, unfortunately. i usually just use "--" in place of an em-dash when i want to avoid excessive semicolonage (now this is a made-up word)
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Old 07-10-2010, 08:14 PM   #120
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Regina Spektor crafted a chorus out of the non-word version of "eat," a.k.a., "eet." B4king my review right now.
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