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Old 03-02-2007, 08:21 PM   #31
badtaste
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Is that a Philip K. Dick book? I've read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sleep, and that was bomb.
I'm in the process of reading that right now. Saw Blade Runner a few weeks ago, so thought I'd have a look at the book. I am liking what I'm reading.

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Matthew Reilly did 'The Seven Wonders' as well, his books are ridiculous but really good fun
Is Stephen King's Dark Tower series worth reading? I've heard it's meant to be good but I'm daunted by the number of volumes
Yeh, it's a good read. Have a go, it might not be for everyone.

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I read Salem's Lot a few weeks ago mainly because I finished The Dark Tower and didn't want it to end .

It was decent, a good read if you like teh vampires.

8/10

Last book I was read was Temple by the relatively unknown Aussie author Matthew Riley. All his books are pretty fast paced and this one is no exception. But like all his books, every thing's too convenient and it gets a little "ohh, yeah right...", but I still enjoyed it quite a lot.

It's about a Professor William Race who is a language guy (forgotten already, he knows Latin, German and a few other languages) who is taken by DARPA in order for him to translate a old manuscript writted by a monk in Peru during the time of the invasion of the Spanish (~1500AD) (I'm not good with history, so be nice). Apparently this manuscript tells of the location of an Incan Idol which DARPA needs to find for certain reasons)

I recommend it for a quick read, it's great fun.

8.5/10
I can't remember if I have read that one. I've read the Scarecrow series, and Contest (which was an absolutely beautiful concept - is a movie in the works?). Yeh, good paced action. I've had a break from him though - Hovercar racer didn't look too appealing.

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Old 03-02-2007, 08:35 PM   #32
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The last book I read was The Perks Of Being A Wallflower. I love that book.
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Old 03-02-2007, 08:37 PM   #33
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Would like to add a slight reminder, that it would appreciated if you could post a summary, or review, or your thoughts on your text of choice, in order to spark some discussion within the community.

G unit.
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Old 03-02-2007, 08:38 PM   #34
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I'm too lazy and high to do that right now. Maybe tomorrow.

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Old 03-02-2007, 08:42 PM   #35
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The last book I read was The Perks Of Being A Wallflower. I love that book.
Ugh, yes. Book is so good.

9.5/10
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Old 03-02-2007, 09:00 PM   #36
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Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger
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Old 03-02-2007, 09:41 PM   #37
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Last book I read was The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. It's about a girl who is losing her mind. This is the first and only Sylvia Plath I have read. A few people told me this book was boring, self-absorbed, not worth reading, etc... but I liked it very much. I related to Esther well and enjoyed the writing immensely. Absolutley loved when Esther was going through all the ways she could kill herself.

I started reading Lucy: The Beginnings of Humankind. It's probably gonna take me like three months or more to finish.
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:47 AM   #38
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I can't remember if I have read that one. I've read the Scarecrow series, and Contest (which was an absolutely beautiful concept - is a movie in the works?). Yeh, good paced action. I've had a break from him though - Hovercar racer didn't look too appealing.
Yeah Ice Station and Area 7 are the Scarecrow books, great fun!

I read Contest just before starting Temple, and yeah it's great. I think there was a movie in the works a few years back but nothings come about.

Yeah Hovercar Racer is the only one I haven't read, and I probably won't.
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Old 03-03-2007, 01:34 AM   #39
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I just started Invitation to a Beheading by Vladimir Nabokov (wrote Lolita) and I really enjoy it.

Take the prose styling from Lolita, put it in a condemned criminals head, and mix it with tons of nonsense. For example, even in the first chapter lol, he dances a waltz with the guard. The warden comes in his room and eats his dinner and smokes his cigarette. then the prisoner (Cincinattus C. who is arrested and ordered to execution for "Gnostical Turpitude" which, as far as i can find, means 'breaking the laws of matter' or sumshit) gets up and walks out of the prison into town. : )

I really like it so far.
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Old 03-03-2007, 01:47 AM   #40
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I purchased War and Peace but I got some books to finish before I read it.
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Old 03-03-2007, 03:21 AM   #41
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I just started Invitation to a Beheading by Vladimir Nabokov (wrote Lolita) and I really enjoy it.

Take the prose styling from Lolita, put it in a condemned criminals head, and mix it with tons of nonsense. For example, even in the first chapter lol, he dances a waltz with the guard. The warden comes in his room and eats his dinner and smokes his cigarette. then the prisoner (Cincinattus C. who is arrested and ordered to execution for "Gnostical Turpitude" which, as far as i can find, means 'breaking the laws of matter' or sumshit) gets up and walks out of the prison into town. : )

I really like it so far.
I'm still working on that 'Feature Movie: Lolita'. Tell me about the book though (i'm guessing you've read it). Interesting? I reviewed the film for high school once, and while researching it, I read that the book was way different to the film. With Kubrick's depiction, there's that dark humour, but without any humour, I can't see how Nabokov could have made it an interesting read.
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Old 03-03-2007, 03:34 AM   #42
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Just finished reading "The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, The Unbeliever". I started a thread about this series a little while back, so if you're interested use the search button.

The book I read before that for university was "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde. That's a great book considering it is still wildly relevant today. I think everyone knows the basic story to that one and I recommend it as it has some interesting discussion about aesthetic appreciation.
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Old 03-03-2007, 03:48 AM   #43
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The book I read before that for university was "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde. That's a great book considering it is still wildly relevant today. I think everyone knows the basic story to that one and I recommend it as it has some interesting discussion about aesthetic appreciation.
Tell me about it more. i'm trying to brush up on my classics, and I always tell myself to try read some Oscar Wilde, but first I need some motivation. What's it about, and what are the themes of the 'The Picture of Dorian Gray'? Not exactly sure what era Wilde lived in (1800s? I have no idea), but there is something about Old England that is a turn off for me. I just visualise all these uppity class aristrocrats or dirty beggar types.
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Old 03-03-2007, 04:13 AM   #44
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Then you'll love it. This book is Oscar Wilde pretty much having a go at aristocracy and the such. The basic theme in the book is about pleasure and aestheticism. About how far one is willing to go to maintain a hedonic lifestyle and being able to become a spectator of one's own life. Really interesting story too. About a young man named Dorian Gray who pretty much sells his soul for infinite 'youngness' and does vile things throughout the book while maintaining a gentleman's and aristocratic manner.
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Old 03-03-2007, 04:44 AM   #45
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The last book I read was The Scar by China Mieville, totally awesome.
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Old 03-03-2007, 06:07 AM   #46
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A Crown of Swords - Book 8 of the Wheel of Time - Robert Jordan.

I haven't finished it yet, but I've read if before so I know it's a good book (this is my second time going through the WoT series). However, I also picked up a copy of Bill Brysons new book 'A Short History of Almost Everything' the other day which I plan to read once I've done the WoT again.
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Old 03-03-2007, 06:18 AM   #47
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I think The Da Vinci Code was the last book I read, which is kind of sad considering it was more than a year ago. I think I'm going to read The House of The Scorpion. It has to do with some form of cloning, and that's all I know.

I thought The Da Vinci Code was really good. It became a trend to knock on it, but I think that it was a really suspenseful book. It also had a lot of information, but did not bore you with it. The book was non-stop interesting.
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Old 03-03-2007, 06:36 AM   #48
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Yeah, I enjoyed the Da Vinci Code, I read it before all the silly movie hype. I read it one night on holiday, I found it an interesting and compelling read at the time, it was like a good action movie in the form of a book.
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Old 03-03-2007, 06:40 AM   #49
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Last book I read was "Not so Quiet..." by Helen Zenna Smith. It was a load of Feminist, War Diary BS that I never want to read again, but unfortunately will probably have to since its one of the texts for my A2 English Literature Course.
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Old 03-03-2007, 09:24 AM   #50
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Roger - Lolita was actually funny. Nabokov's prose had a great amount of humur in it, it was very dark, and the humor was not so much in 'teh funniez' but more in the situations humbert humbert was in. like when he and c. quilty meet for the big 'showdown.' the bullets he fires at him like didn't fire from a gun, they were very slow, and quilty was able to run away from them, the actual bullets. and sometimes they would like fall as soon as they were fired.

just one situation. it's not as troubling as it may seem, after all it's a novel about a pedophile taking a young girl after marrying her mother (who then dies) and pretty much having her as a sex slave. so, luckily nabokov lightened it up a bit. good times, that one.
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Old 03-03-2007, 10:09 AM   #51
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i finished from a buick 8 by stephen king. i am now reading the dead zone
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Old 03-03-2007, 10:38 AM   #52
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Jeez why do you guys read such crappy popnovels
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Old 03-03-2007, 11:06 AM   #53
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Keep the Aspidistra Flying by George Orwell

I liked it. It was a good read.
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Old 03-03-2007, 11:16 AM   #54
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Yeah, you can't really go wrong with Orwell.
Also, although I've read it over and over again through the years, I somehow keep coming back to 'To Kill A Mockingbird'. Such a classic
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Old 03-03-2007, 11:57 AM   #55
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Yeah, you can't really go wrong with Orwell.
Very true. reps++
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Old 03-03-2007, 05:40 PM   #56
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Last book I read was The Inferno.
Great book.
I'm currently working on The Godfather for personal reading and Lord of the Flies for English.
Both great books so far.
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Old 03-03-2007, 06:19 PM   #57
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The Real Frank Zappa Book

It's an autobiography about Frank Zappa. About how he grew up and many of his opinions. Also puts down some myths about him. It was a good book, funny, but was a little slow at the end. I liked it a lot, and would recommended it to any Zappa fans.

9/10
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Old 03-03-2007, 09:33 PM   #58
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Roger - Lolita was actually funny. Nabokov's prose had a great amount of humur in it, it was very dark, and the humor was not so much in 'teh funniez' but more in the situations humbert humbert was in. like when he and c. quilty meet for the big 'showdown.' the bullets he fires at him like didn't fire from a gun, they were very slow, and quilty was able to run away from them, the actual bullets. and sometimes they would like fall as soon as they were fired.

just one situation. it's not as troubling as it may seem, after all it's a novel about a pedophile taking a young girl after marrying her mother (who then dies) and pretty much having her as a sex slave. so, luckily nabokov lightened it up a bit. good times, that one.
Sup Jacob. Hmm okay then. Is the movie adaptation pretty true to the novel? Peter Sellers is an absolute laugh.

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Yeah, you can't really go wrong with Orwell.
Also, although I've read it over and over again through the years, I somehow keep coming back to 'To Kill A Mockingbird'. Such a classic
Speaking of Orwell, any recommendations? Have read 1984 and Animal Farm only. I'm assuming most of his other works are politically themed.

I read 'To Kill a Mockingbird' for year 9 (or 10, can't remember). I though it was alright. I guess you've got to love the book for the issue that itexplores (cheers Harper Lee), but I don't know. A good read, but I can't see myself reading it again (well, probably because I resold the book).

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Old 03-04-2007, 02:26 AM   #59
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tucker max i hope they serve beer in hell
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Old 03-04-2007, 03:07 AM   #60
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Currently reading this anthology of American short stories for one of my classes. Nice to get a broad introduction to some writers I haven't been able to check out. Plan on branching out and snatching up some more Bernard Malamud after this, really loved "The Magic Barrel," need to read up on more of his work. Also liked the Donald Barthelme entry, "Indian Uprising." Sometimes his stuff is so simple, you kind of think you've missed the point and then other times, it's so complex that it makes you want to pull your hair out. This one falls under the latter category, but beautiful stuff in any case.

Also working through The New American Militarism by Andrew Bacevich for a media studies class. Only into the third chapter but it's pretty compelling stuff. The author is conservative, but approaches the topic in a level-handed manner, nailing anyone and everyone to the wall. Essentially a review of the American culture of military, how the culture evolved, how the public perceives the culture and the ultimate effects of the culture. Guy is hella qualified to take note of all this and the book is filled with detailed military and political history. Wild, man.
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