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Old 01-15-2013, 04:45 PM   #271
GnarlyShillelagh
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I can't help you with that right now, sorry.
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:37 PM   #272
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Hello everyone!

I just posted a review for Polyenso's new album One Big Particular Loop, and so far I have gotten one neg without any constructive feedback or criticism. Do you think guys could help me out? Let me know of any awkward phrasing or something that just doesn't make sense?

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Old 02-17-2013, 02:45 PM   #273
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http://www.sputnikmusic.com/review/55105/Iceage-Youre-Nothing/

Is this actually that bad?
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Old 02-17-2013, 05:58 PM   #274
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It lacks flow and there are some grammar issues. Also, it doesn't really have a conclusion and just sort of stops. So... It's not atrocious, but there's a decent amount that could be done to improve it.
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:57 PM   #275
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TPIY review

Just wanted to get a little feedback on this review.



Starting off with the very aggressive first track, Premeditated, you'll get a good feel for what you're getting into, or so you'd think but there are some nice surprises to be found here. I can really admire the sound effects used. It has a nice industrial vibe, as if someone filled a bucket full of nails and starting rattling it. And now the guitars are doing something different than the usual chugging. The lead guitars are all over the place and sound pretty spooky, especially in The Devil's Contract and Fiction Religion.

Pushing through the next three tracks, Fiction Religion, Digging Your Grave and Population Control we get more of the heavy side. Digging Your Grace has some quite remarkable moments, like the scratchy airy intro and the intense ending. Fast pace verses and flowing chorus's make this one of the better tracks. As for the other two tracks. They have pretty awful chorus's. though Population Control does have this amazing rap section about half way through, This is a strong point that they shouldn't let go of. the clean vocals really are hit or miss. Tracks such as Troll, Sober and Soulless and Glad You're Gone have such well performed and admirable cleans.

Troll, is borderline speed metal, with a bounce bass intro and a huge breakdown toward the end. All supported by a great deal of dynamic mid tone screams. I consider this song to be a transition for the the better tracks. This is how they shouldn't have started it. Following Troll is The Devil's Contract. Such a great track that personally reminds me of Rob Zombie of Mairylin Manson. Verses are heavy and memorable and vocals are eerie and well done with quite a bit of unique lead guitar. Often times you'll hear frontman Landon Tewers whispering and getting angry. Almost like we're in his head.

Two of my favorite tracks Shyann Weeps and Bible Butcher have a powerful southern sound, much like their EP, Wife Beater. I want more songs like this. These two songs are also very similar to The Devil's contract. Drumming on these tracks are actually worth mentioning. Not doing a whole lot but doing a enough different things to catch my attention.

Between Shyann Weeps and Bible Butcher we do get a good softer song. This one sounds like an anthem. very alternative, you could say. It's more of a rock song than metal. Which they executed very well and is a nice break from all the racket.

At last, we reach my favorite song on the album, Glad You're Gone. This was originally a solo song of the vocalist's. this track is flawless. You could almost consider it pop punk. No screams. Very polished clean vocals with a chorus to die for and lead guitar that will be stuck in your head the second you hear it.

Overall: this is an outstanding record. Filled with emotion and well written music although if you're looking for great musicianship; you probably won't find it here.
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Old 03-30-2013, 10:17 AM   #276
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Hey guys this is my first review, what do you think i should add or change

This is my first regiew so I picked a band from my country to start.

Costa Rica is a small country with some Metal bands growing and growing in the last years like Pneuma, Sight of Emptiness, Corpse Garden and of course, Advent of Bedlam.

There are hundreds of Melodic Death Metal albums that sound all the same, but "Behold the Chaos" is one of the exceptions.
It starts with a 40 seconds instrumental opening track that leads us to a fast, heavy and agressive song titled "Enlightment of the Forsaken" which is the least melodic song but with some great riffs, consistent drumming and well structured tempo changes.
The rest of the album offers a great mix and great changes between catchy melodies without being tedius and energetic blasts.

The vocals of Roy Zumbado are pretty good, alternating crude but effective highs and lows with the different riffs shown throughout each song, this alternating vocals and the diversity of riffs is what makes this album not one of the many, wich is one of the problems nowadays with melodeath, most bands keep repeating the same formulaic riffs over and over again giving the feel the you have been listening to a 50 minutes song all the time, well Max Gutiérrez and Isak Arroyo know how to write riffs. Then we have the drums playing a very important role, wich are no what you would generally expect from a melodeath album, Alex Ovares does a great work with incessant blasts beats and double bass throughout the whole album giving a powerfull sound to each song, also the tempo changes are very well structured with some groovy rythms.

If you are looking for a different Melodic Death Metal album give "Behold the Chaos" a try, while all not the tracks are very memorable the album is pretty solid with great riffs, good vocals and great drumming.

Recommended tracks

Awaiting for Chaos
Harp of Ruin
Vessels of Sin
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Old 03-30-2013, 12:12 PM   #277
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"The vocals of Roy Zumbado..."
That paragraph is a nasty run-on sentence (technically a comma splice). You also misspelled "which." I'm sure others can give more detailed advice, but those were two things that immediately caught my eye.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:18 PM   #278
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeudyEv View Post
Hey guys this is my first review, what do you think i should add or change

This is my first regiew so I picked a band from my country to start.
Hi, I'm Tom. I'll be your grammar nazi for the evening. Strap in and try not to cry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeudyEv View Post
Costa Rica is a small country with some Metal bands growing and growing in the last years like Pneuma, Sight of Emptiness, Corpse Garden and of course, Advent of Bedlam.
Okay, point number 1: "growing and growing" obviously doesn't work to connect the small country and its metal bands properly. Furthermore, the "growing" status of the metal bands seems arbitrary (how tall are these guys? 8'3"?) and I think you're trying to describe the increasing number of quality Costa Rican metal bands, which is unclear here. Fix that. Furthermore, this is just one sentence, and isn't enough to stand on its own as a paragraph, especially given that the next sentence is:

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeudyEv View Post
There are hundreds of Melodic Death Metal albums that sound all the same, but "Behold the Chaos" is one of the exceptions.
While I'm (relatively) sure that this is a tack-on to your last named band (Advent of Bedlam) describing their album ("Behold the Chaos," a title which should be in italics rather than quotes), it's still a really ambiguous sentence that has little connection to the previous sentigraph. You need a segue like "The most recent album from Advent, Behold the Chaos, is a rare exception in the modern world of same-sounding melodic death metal releases." Or something like that. But don't use that. Because I wrote that and using what I wrote would be plagiarism.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeudyEv View Post
It starts with a 40 seconds instrumental opening track that leads us to a fast, heavy and agressive song titled "Enlightment of the Forsaken" which is the least melodic song but with some great riffs, consistent drumming and well structured tempo changes.
Everything in bold should be modified, as should the start of this sentence, which is sort of weak (but I'll leave you to sort that issue on your own). "Seconds" should be "second," you misspelled "aggressive," you misspelled "Enlightenment," "the least melodic song" needs something to be compared to (i.e. write it as "the least melodic song on the album" - you can use that). The "but with some" should essentially start a new sentence describing the same song. I'll leave it up to you to figure out how to do that, but it shouldn't be too hard.

The next part is still a part of this paragraph, technically, but there's zero connection between the two sentences, which still aren't enough to hold together on their own as a paragraph.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeudyEv View Post
The rest of the album offers a great mix and great changes between catchy melodies without being tedius and energetic blasts.
"Great" is kind of a weak descriptor in music journalism to begin with, but when you use it twice in a row it loses meaning. Pick a new word for the second descriptor (or cut it out altogether). "Changes between" is an awkward phrasing which I wouldn't recommend using. "Variation between" or, better yet, "variety of" would be better suited to your purposes, but you could also find another word pairing that would work better. If you tried.

"tedious" is misspelled. "And energetic blasts" makes no sense and is hurled onto the end of that sentence like a drunk girl hurling the evening's salad onto the curb: without tact. Kill it or fix it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeudyEv View Post
The vocals of Roy Zumbado are pretty good, alternating crude but effective highs and lows with the different riffs shown throughout each song, this alternating vocals and the diversity of riffs is what makes this album not one of the many, wich is one of the problems nowadays with melodeath, most bands keep repeating the same formulaic riffs over and over again giving the feel the you have been listening to a 50 minutes song all the time, well Max Gutiérrez and Isak Arroyo know how to write riffs. Then we have the drums playing a very important role, wich are no what you would generally expect from a melodeath album, Alex Ovares does a great work with incessant blasts beats and double bass throughout the whole album giving a powerfull sound to each song, also the tempo changes are very well structured with some groovy rythms.
Any time you see two words with a comma between them bolded in the previous paragraph, change the comma to a period and capitalize the second word to start a new sentence.

Any word that is bolded by itself is misspelled ("rythms" should be "rhythms"), the wrong word by way of misspelling ("no" should be "not"), or is plural when it shouldn't be ("blasts beats" should also be "blast beats"). Yes, there's more than just what I pointed out in parenthesis, but I've bolded it all for you. You should be able to figure it out.

"with the different riffs shown" - I think you're going for the idea that he modifies his voice based on the guitar riffs - high or low depending on what he gets from the six string. That's not super clear here. And "shown" is a poor word for describing riffs being played, blasted, strummed, chugged, whatever. I cannot see riffs while listening to an album.

"This alternating vocals and riffs" is not grammatically correct. You could say "The alternating vocals and riffs." In fact, just do that. I can't be assed to come up with a better way to say it right now.

"melodeath," should be "melodeath:" But let's focus on the bigger issues.

"giving the feel the you have" should be something like "giving you the feeling that you have." I think. I hope?

There should be a comma after that well. But make sure you turn the comma before it into a period and capitalize it first.

"Then we have the drums" is a terribly weak transition and the drums have nothing to do with anything earlier on in the paragraph. You should figure out a way to fix that. If you can.

"does a great work" should just be "does great work" or "does a great job." That was an easy one!

That's it for that paragraph. Whew.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeudyEv View Post
If you are looking for a different Melodic Death Metal album give "Behold the Chaos" a try, while all not the tracks are very memorable the album is pretty solid with great riffs, good vocals and great drumming.
Again, split the sentence at the comma. Same rules as before.

"pretty solid with great riffs" could be something like "pretty solid and has great riffs." It's still not a good sentence that way, but it'd make it better. This paragraph is still really, really weak regardless.

I get the impression that English isn't your first language. If so, that's alright - this is way better than I could do in any language other than my own. But if I'm being brutally honest, you need reinforcement in the language before you should consider writing articles of professional quality in it.

If English is your primary language, then god help us all.
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Old 04-01-2013, 05:09 PM   #279
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I'm pretty sure they speak Spanish in Costa Rica. So it's all well and good.
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Old 04-19-2013, 01:00 AM   #280
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Hey guys, I'm not sure how much this thread is viewed, but if anyone could give me feedback on this review I'd appreciate it. I don't review much and I'm hoping to improve my writing in general:

Summary - Frank Turner would seem to be both a shower and a grower


Recently, for reasons unbeknown to me, I have heard the question "are you a grower or a shower?", in relation to penile dimensions, an awful lot. I either need new friends or to stop revealing myself quite as much. Either way, my point is that saying one answer is to imply that you are somehow lacking in the other; a concept that I believe also applies to music. Whilst music with hooks and catchy lyrics may well hold attention in the short-term, it easily develops into a repetitive and banal listening experience in the long run. Conversely, music that is only appreciated after several listens is unlikely to hold much attention within our modern, ADHD-plagued musical conveyor belt of prepubescent divas and dickheads. The best albums have that rare combination of an initial spark of originality combined with deeper subtle layers that can be aurally scratched away over the weeks and months following that first press of the play button.

This is why Frank Turner's latest album Tape Deck Heart is a resounding success, even if his progression from punky folk to a more stadium and radio-friendly sound may turn some long time fans off at first impression. The album kicks off with a microcosm of that progression, with Turner's familiar vocals and simple strummed chords commencing "Recovery", before the song explodes into a cacophony of euphoric piano and drums as his backing band The Sleeping Souls lay down a statement of intent. This is as much their record as it is Turner's, with a much bigger focus on a full band sound, complete with gang vocals (see "Polaroid Picture") and more complex instrumentation than we are used to with Turner's previous work. Having said that, some of the most powerful moments on this album are when roots are revisited, with "Anymore" standing out as Turner rationalises his decision to leave an anonymous lover. There are no Sleeping Souls, just one man and his guitar, and the song is all the more sincere and moving for it.

Returning to my initial analogy, show and grow are present in equal measure here. One of the album's highlights (and unsurprisingly the next single to be released), "The Way I Tend To Be", consists of an addictive chord structure that, when combined with fantastic chorus vocals, results in one of the showiest tracks Turner has created. Equally though, the following track "Plain Sailing Weather" failed to grab my attention at first listen. Take these pre-chorus lyrics for instance:

" The problem with falling in love in late bars,
Is that there's always more nights, there's always more bars.
The problem with showing your lover your scars
Is that everybody's lover is covered in scars"


I physically cringed when I first heard those lines. However each and every subsequent time I listened to it I found something different to love about the song; from the delightful piano during the bridge to the increasingly passionate lyrical delivery towards the song's conclusion. It grew on me, and continues to do so. I must just highlight as well that the lyrics above are misrepresentative of the general content of the album. Turner's lyrical prowess has not faded with time, with their sincerity bolstered by his distinctive and enthusiastic delivery. There is a notable lack of political content here, with the songs focusing instead on relationships past and present, as well as the futile attempts at grappling with the associated plethora of emotions.

Now that even the "shower" tracks are turning into "growers" to me, Tape Deck Heart has become that perfect beast; a maelstrom of songs that seem both familiar and constantly fresh on repeated listens. Frank Turner has done a hell of a job to keep his individual sound accessible without succumbing to the typical pitfalls of those artists who hope to tread that fine line between recognition and selling out. If he manages to maintain the sincerity and passion found in these songs whilst keeping himself grounded, there is little doubt that this man is likely to be able to show his growers to crowds around the world for years to come.
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:50 PM   #281
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Just finished my first review (Rwake's 'Hell Is A Door To The Sun") and was hoping to get some feedback, constructive criticism, etc. before submitting it. Cheers.


* *Rwake, hailing from Little Rock, have made quite a name for themselves in the sludge metal scene. In a genre that considers geographical origin as much as sound and style, they have distinguished themselves from many of their peers with a strong focus on dynamics: one minute, bludgeoning the listener into submission with crushing, abrasive riffs and vocals, and in the next, lulling them into tranquility with soft, melodic passages, giving a short reprieve, before dragging them back down into a swamp of despair.

* Combining elements of the choking dirge of Neurosis with the oppressive sludge of Eyehategod, Rwake create a style here that is their own, while at the same time paying tribute to the artists who influenced them. They merge doom-like riffs with light, ethereal guitars, and space-y keyboards to establish a unique contrast; southern sludge- style shouts mixed with old school black metal screams amidst the wall of distortion make the the lyrics unintelligible for the most part, which actually helps*to add to the swampy atmosphere of the album. And while there are simple, but effective, power chord riffs aplenty, guitarists Chuck and Gravy go beyond that, playing melodic harmonies and even a solo or two, which provide a nice contrast to the onslaught of denseness, while showing that they can actually play their instruments. Rwake's self-deprecating use of samples (which are mostly taken from film and TV) show a sense of humor that isn't really apparent in the music surrounding them, as if to say " Don't take all of this too seriously".

* While Rwake's approach works form the most part,*Hell Is A Door To The Sun is not without it's shortcomings; the tracks sound disjointed and the transitions forced at times, as if the band simply cobbled together various ideas and pieces without giving much thought as to how they fit together or putting much effort into creating more fluidity within certain tracks. ('The Cat And The Snake' is the best example of this.) The biggest issue, however, is the vocal delivery; there really is no pattern or cadence, and the jumbled phrasing leaves much to be desired.

* With their proper debut, Rwake put their own spin on sludge metal, giving the genre a much needed shot in the arm. While their songwriting and arranging would greatly improve with each subsequent release, the energy and enthusiasm found on Hell Is A Door To The Sun make for a great time. This record is certainly not the recommended starting point for those looking to get into Rwake, as it shows a band still far from perfecting their craft; it does, however, show a band finding their identity.
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Old 05-27-2013, 03:16 AM   #282
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'In a genre that considers geographical origin as much as sound and style'

^I'm not sure what you mean by that. Elaborate on it or change.

'which actually helps*to add to the swampy atmosphere of the album'

^which actaully adds to/enhances the swampy...

'which provide a nice contrast'

^provides, also... the use of samples shows...

'a sense of humor that isn't really apparent in the music surrounding them'

^I didn't get it at first. I guess you're trying to say that a sense of humor is not a frequent attribute of sludge. Rephrase.

Try to avoid brackets. In the first instance you can use commas. In the second just leave them out.

Other than that, solid review. It flows really well.
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Old 05-27-2013, 04:19 PM   #283
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Cool. Will remedy those before submitting. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment. It's most appreciated. Cheers.
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Old 05-29-2013, 08:41 PM   #284
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Hey, if I could get any proofreeding for this, I'd appreciate it.


When waiting ten years, the wait can be tiring for fans who are expecting the next album to come along from their favorite artist. This type of wait, while not common, usually results in either an awful album or a masterpiece based on the expectation of the fans. Sometimes, it’s in between, with the end result being decent. With Peter Gabriel, his most recent effort that contained original material, he falls into the latter category.

2002’s “Up” makes for an extremely engaging listen, beginning with the gripping “Darkness”, which flat states one of the many themes of “Up”. Where 1992’s “Us” focused mainly on Gabriel’s personal issues, such as the growing estrangement from his first daughter, Anna-Marie; and the failure of his first marriage, among other subjects. “Up” makes use of its sixty-seven minute long running time to cover more darker subjects, the most prominent one being death. Other subjects such as fear (“Darkness”), life itself (“Growing Up”), the stages of grief (“I Grieve”), et cetera, et cetera.

"Up”, or the songs “Sky Blue” and “Signal to Noise”, further expand on the use of world music, ever present since Gabriel’s eighties works, and make for the stronger listens, while tracks like ”Darkness” and “Growing Up” implement the use of electronics, especially the latter with its pulsating beat complimenting the track. One nagging problem with “Up” is the length itself, which makes the album difficult to listen to without getting bored, with some of the tracks dragging on too long. (“No Way Out” comes to mind) But when it comes to “Up”, it manages to stay consistent all the way through, so when the listener is fully captivated by the material, it is sure to be an enjoyable from beginning to end.

In the end, “Up” not only makes for an enjoyably solid experience, but may be one of Gabriel’s greatest achievements. While overshadowed by “Melt” and “So”, it has to be one of best among his catalogue.

Rating: 5/5

Thank you for reading.
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:02 PM   #285
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I'd love if I could get help with this, since I'm being told I'm contradicting myself in the review:

When highly anticipated albums are announced these days, there’s always hype surrounding it. Going into The Knife’s “Shaking the Habitual”, there really wasn’t much to expect. It was just another album by The Knife, and hopefully expanded on what the previous LP, “Silent Shout”, set out to achieve. This is not the case, with the duo falling flat on their faces.

“Shaking the Habitual” is plagued with several problems, such as the length of the album. Ninety minutes seems understandable for concept albums and instrumental records, but for an IDM group heavily inspired by avant-garde styled music, it doesn’t work. Another issue is within some of the songs and/or “pieces” such as “Crake” and “Old Dreams Waiting to Be Realized”, with the former being a waste of space with it consisting of feedback and electronic fodder, fitting of something like “Metal Machine Music”. The latter, while a nice composition, drags on for fifteen minutes too long and fails to capture the attention of the listener, with it failing to gel as it goes on, and makes it look as The Knife is trying too hard to be experimental and avant-garde; it simply drags down the duo and the quality of the album itself.

Other songs, such as “Networking”, “Full of Fire”, and “Wrap Your Arms Around Me”, make for the highlights of the album, with it managing to entertain the listener with the exotic lyrics of Karin Andersson layered among the keyboards that make those tracks so great, making for a perfect pair. Even with the length of “Shaking the Habitual”, the album manages to get stronger near the end like the duo had been given an adrenaline rush, and makes for some of the best electronic music out there.

Even with the issues on “Shaking the Habitual”, it is a good album and demands the listener’s attention from the very start. While it may take several listens to fully understand the duo’s ideas and what they were doing on this album, it makes for an enjoyable experience, despite it being one of their weaker albums. Go see for yourself and see what all the hype is about, you’ll be sure to understand it.
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Old 06-20-2013, 01:19 PM   #286
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First Hip-Hop review feedback please

Hey guys, i've been writing up my first hip-hop review and I'm looking for any constructive criticisms. I'm still going to edit the review and make it flow better but I'm wondering what I can improve on so far? Here's a rough draft. I appreciate anybody who takes the time to look at it

It’s truly astounding how Tech N9ne has managed to build such a massive fan base as an independent hip-hop artist. Although after his most recent releases some are labeling him a “sell out“, it’s hard to argue against the success he‘s rightfully earned for himself. He often has an insanely busy touring schedule and he’s been keeping the albums coming for well over a decade. However, one doesn’t reach such great heights without any talent and man does Tech have some mad flow.

Often overshadowed by “K.O.D.” which was released the same year, “Sickology 101” is a great album that generously displays Tech N9ne’s rapping ability.
The only real problem lies within the filler which is spread throughout the 18 tracks, but thankfully there are some real gems here to make up for it. Album highlight ‘Dysfunctional’ is a killer jam that represents Tech’s ability to spit lyrical fire. He opens the song strongly with both speed and attitude which builds up to a laid back chorus with a chill reggae vibe. Although Tech’s at the top of his game, the song is also made more exciting by the guest vocals of Big Scoob and longtime pal Krizz Kaliko. All three artists have their own rapping sections and they each add their own unique flavor to the song.

Apart from his impressive delivery, much of the appeal in Tech N9ne’s music is in the lyrics themselves. Sure, they‘re often over-the-top or cocky, but they‘re also glittered with humor and hard not to enjoy. A prime example of this would be in the fan favorite ‘Red Nose’ which finds Tech drawing comparisons to Rudolph as he rhymes about not fitting in with the crowd. It starts out with a brilliantly sarcastic opening dialogue where he essentially gives the middle finger to the industry. The song is laid back, but manages to capture what feels like an effortless performance by Tech as he uses clever lyricism to spit fire at his enemies.

I find it intriguing that despite his dark sense of humor Tech N9ne still manages sneak in a surprisingly meaningful song or into nearly every album. Thankfully, “Sickology 101” is no different and ‘Far Away’ takes the cake as the most poignant track on the album as Tech sets aside the clever lyrics for a much more honest song that finds him contemplating life and even death itself. The lyrics are much deeper than one might expect from Tech N9ne. It’s a reminder that he is human after all and that behind his persona he’s more than capable of injecting meaning into his music.

For any fan of Tech N9ne or hip-hop in general, “Sickology 101” is worth checking out, even if it’s only for the standout tracks. However, all the guest appearances help keep things feeling fresh and the album never wears out its welcome throughout its hefty 18 tracks.
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Old 10-08-2013, 01:49 PM   #287
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My first review, any and all feedback would be welcome. I wrote this in Notepad so there might be some odd line skipping.

I'm just going to say it right out of the gate. Vengence Falls is not another Shogun. Odds are Trivium will never
create an album quite like it again. However, if you enjoyed In Waves, you will probably end up liking this. While
it never reaches the heights of that album, it does offer some catchy songs that'll have you jamming along with it
in minutes.

Vengence Falls feels like a direct continuation of In Waves's sound. The guitar's have the same sound and tone, the
drums haven't really improved, and Matt Heafy is content on singing nearly all of his lines (screams make a return,
though in a severly reduced format). But, this makes sense. In Waves saw the highest sales Trivium had seen, so why
would they not continue with that sound?

Unfortunetly, this album falters a lot. The biggest complaint would be David Draimam. His influence on this album
is undeniable. On some songs like "Brave This Storm" and "To Believe" sound like Disturbed rip-offs. If Disturbed
played these songs, the only difference would be the vocals. It's rather disappointing. A great example of this
would be the song "Villainy Thrives." The vocal delivery after the first chorus is classic David. It just doesn't
fit well with Trivium. They try to make it their own by adding some screams, but it just feels forced.

As I've said, if you liked In Waves, you will probably like this album. There's still quite a bit of chugging riffs
on this album. Opener "Brave This Storm" opens with a prolonged riff the fails to pick up any excitement. The track
itself is rather unremarkable besides the chorus, which is quite fun. However, even after all these faults, Trivium
still have managed to imrpove upon their lyrical ability. No longer are they repeating the chorus over and over
again, with only one or two versus. The songs feel fully fleshed out which improves the replayability dramatically.

I truly did enjoy this album. It served as a nice, fun listen. However, I feel it's future will just end up being
background music. With no real stand out tracks, I wouldn't recommend the album to anyone who didn't enjoy In
Waves. I would actually recommend going and listening to that record again instead of picking this up. It's not
bad, but it's not good either.


Album stream: http://trivium.org/vengeancefalls/
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:00 PM   #288
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Cool New Review for Painkiller (Rating: 4)

Here's a draft I wrote for a Painkiller review, let me know what you guys think:


After the mediocre Ram It Down, Judas Priest were in crisis. Thrash metal was at the peak of its power, while prog metal bands like Queensryche and Fates Warning were also making a scene. NWBHM partners Iron Maiden and Motorhead were pretty much past their prime. Effectively, it seemed that metal now belonged to a new generation, and the Priests were starting to look like a thing of the past.

But they still had one more weapon in their arsenal. They still had a bit of energy left, enough for one more album before the end of an era. This album was, of course, Painkiller.

To understand Painkiller, one has to look back on a long and complex trayectory. It’s easy to think that the Priest improved step-by-step until they got to this “behemoth”. However, those of us who’ve actually listened to everything the band made up to this point know that things are far more complicated.

For starters, songwriting had mostly gotten inconsistent after Stained Class. Several of the albums that followed had at least 3 weak songs, and they simply didn’t feel as cohesive as the earlier 70’s classics. This is likely due to the fact that, after Stained Class, the band focused more on selling their image than on making ambitious music. To be fair, it also didn’t seem as if they could improve their musical formula any further.
With all that in mind, Painkiller seems, effectively, like an attempt to return to the band’s classic 70’s era. The band certainly sounds more metallic on here than they do on everything done from Hell Bent For Leather/Killing Machine to Ram It Down. Granted, Ram It Down had a metallic edge to it, but this album went even further.
The key change was on drums: Scott Travis replaced John Holland, who had served on more Priest studio albums than any other drummer up to that time (a grand total of 5). Travis would go on to equal Holland’s record, albeit in a poorer fashion, since every album after Painkiller with the arguable exception of Angel of Retribution pretty much sucked. But the importance of Travis lay in his emphasis on pure speed. His loud and fast style went in tune with the music on this new album. Although it’s the reviewer’s opinion that Travis is a tad overrated, particularly when compared to the likes of Les Binks and Simon Phillips, he nevertheless demonstrates some chops on here.
The opening title track begins with a nice drum solo which leads into the main riff. Once Halford begins singing, we know that this is a very different Priest album. The falsettos, the blistering guitar leads, the fast drumming, etc. Also of note is that this is somewhat of a loose concept album, filled with apocalyptic lyrics of impending doom. You have to admit, it does make a nice soundtrack to make you think of the end of the world.

But there are flaws. Firstly, this album doesn’t really have the spark of the 70’s classics. It certainly might feel like an attempt to relive that era, but just doesn’t get there. Second, the riffs are mostly forgettable and lack distinctive elements. Thirdly, with the exception of “A Touch of Evil” all of the songs follow a similar trend: loud, fast and apocalyptic-ish. While some might not have an issue with this, others might eventually get bored with such a formula.

All in all, I have to commend the Priests for putting so much effort into this album. No matter how much some can find to criticize about it, it is still the fruit of hard labor. Plus, when taking into consideration how lackluster they’ve been ever since, then we come to realize that this is it: their last “need-to-hear” album, their last truly worthy album, the last album on which they cared to make kickass metal. Looking for a masterpiece? Jam Sad Wings of Destiny.
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:16 PM   #289
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My review hasn't been proofread yet.
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:37 PM   #290
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"After the mediocre Ram It Down, Judas Priest were in crisis. "

Statement with nothing to back it up, provide examples to push your point. You'll also need to remember that you're reviewing a specific album, not a complete movement in early metal.

"But they still had one more weapon in their arsenal. They still had a bit of energy left, enough for one more album before the end of an era. This album was, of course, Painkiller."

Fanboy-ish in nature, consider removing and changing your tense back to an unbiased level.

"long and complex trayectory."

*trajectory

"It’s easy to think that the Priest "

The band's called Judas Priest, not Priest.

The review runs off the same basic problems mentioned above, namely in the fanboy-ism that dominates your syntax. Look at making yourself more objective and backing your opinions up with actual examples.
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Old 01-17-2014, 04:58 PM   #291
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Lightbulb

Did some editing. I definitely did the right thing in coming here to get proofreading (should've started doing it much sooner tbh).


After the mediocre Ram it Down, Judas Priest were in crisis. That album had been very lackluster in terms of consistency. They had been recording for about a decade and a half and it seemed that they were worn out. Effectively, it looked like metal now belonged to a new generation, and the Priests were starting to look like a thing of the past. Keen on proving that they still had it in them, they released Painkiller.

To understand Painkiller, one has to look back on a long and complex trajectory. It’s easy to think that the Priests improved step-by-step until they got to this “behemoth”. However, those of us who’ve actually listened to everything the band made up to this point know that things are far more complicated.

For starters, songwriting had mostly gotten inconsistent after Stained Class. Several of the albums that followed (eg: Hell Bent For Leather/Killing Machine, Point of Entry, and Ram it Down) had at least 3 weak songs, and they simply didn’t feel as cohesive as the earlier 70’s classics. This is likely due to the fact that, after Stained Class, the band focused more on selling their image than on making ambitious music. To be fair, it also didn’t seem as if they could improve their musical formula any further.

With all that in mind, Painkiller seems, effectively, like an attempt to return to the band’s classic 70’s era. The band certainly sounds more metallic on here than they do on everything done from Hell Bent For Leather/Killing Machine to Ram It Down. Granted, Ram it Down had a metallic edge to it, but this album went even further.

The key change was on drums: Scott Travis replaced John Holland, who had served on more Priest studio albums than any other drummer up to that time (a grand total of 5). Travis would go on to equal Holland’s record, albeit in a poorer fashion, since every album after Painkiller with the arguable exception of Angel of Retribution pretty much sucked. But the importance of Travis lay in his emphasis on pure speed. His loud and fast style went in tune with the music on this new album. Although it’s the reviewer’s opinion that Travis is a tad overrated, particularly when compared to the likes of Les Binks and Simon Phillips, he nevertheless demonstrates some chops on here.

The opening title track begins with a nice drum solo which leads into the main riff. Once Halford begins singing, we know that this is a very different Priest album. The falsettos, the blistering guitar leads, the fast drumming, etc. Also of note is that this is somewhat of a loose concept album, filled with apocalyptic lyrics of impending doom.

But there are flaws. Firstly, this album doesn’t really have the spark of the 70’s classics. It certainly might feel like an attempt to relive that era, but just doesn’t get there. Second, the riffs are mostly forgettable and lack distinctive elements. Thirdly, with the exception of “A Touch of Evil” all of the songs follow a similar trend: loud, fast and apocalyptic-ish. While some might not have an issue with this, others might eventually get bored with such a formula.

All in all, I have to commend the Priests for putting so much effort into this album. No matter how much some can find to criticize about it, it is still the fruit of hard labor. Plus, when taking into consideration how lackluster they’ve been ever since, then we come to realize that this is it: their last “need-to-hear” album, their last truly worthy album, the last album on which they cared to make kickass metal. Looking for a masterpiece? Jam Sad Wings of Destiny.
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Old 01-18-2014, 02:29 PM   #292
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Still need more proofreading before this gets out.
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Old 01-19-2014, 05:18 AM   #293
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"After the mediocre Ram it Down, Judas Priest were in crisis"

should be "were in "a" crisis"

"that album had been very lackluster in terms of consistency"

that sentence just doesn't flow very well, try and change it up


and yeah calling them "the priests" really doesn't give a positive impression of you, just try and call them judas priest or whatever so that you don't sound like a fanboy
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Old 01-19-2014, 12:23 PM   #294
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Did some more editing, here's the results:

After the release of Ram It Down, Judas Priest were in a crisis. That album had suffered from mediocre songwriting. They had been recording for about a decade and a half and it seemed that they were worn out. Effectively, it looked like metal now belonged to a new generation, and the band was starting to look like a thing of the past. Keen on proving that they still had it in them, they released Painkiller.

To understand Painkiller, one has to look back on a long and complex trajectory. It’s easy to think that this band improved step-by-step until they got to this “behemoth”. However, those of us who’ve actually listened to everything the band made up to this point know that things are far more complicated.

For starters, songwriting had mostly gotten inconsistent after Stained Class. Several of the albums that followed (eg: Hell Bent For Leather/Killing Machine, Point of Entry, and Ram it Down) had at least 3 weak songs, and they simply didn’t feel as cohesive as the earlier 70’s classics. This is likely due to the fact that, after Stained Class, the band focused more on selling their image than on making ambitious music. To be fair, it also didn’t seem as if they could improve their musical formula any further.

With all that in mind, Painkiller seems, effectively, like an attempt to return to the band’s classic 70’s era. The band certainly sounds more metallic on here than they do on everything done from Hell Bent For Leather/Killing Machine to Ram It Down. Granted, Ram It Down had a metallic edge to it, but this album went even further.

The key change was on drums: Scott Travis replaced John Holland, who had served on more Priest studio albums than any other drummer up to that time (a grand total of 5). Travis would go on to equal Holland’s record, albeit in a poorer fashion, since every album after Painkiller with the arguable exception of Angel of Retribution pretty much sucked. But the importance of Travis lay in his emphasis on pure speed. His loud and fast style went in tune with the music on this new album. Although it’s the reviewer’s opinion that Travis is a tad overrated, particularly when compared to the likes of Les Binks and Simon Phillips, he nevertheless demonstrates some chops on here.

The opening title track begins with a nice drum solo which leads into the main riff. Once Halford begins singing, we know that this is a very different Priest album. The falsettos, the blistering guitar leads, the fast drumming, etc. Also of note is that this is somewhat of a loose concept album, filled with apocalyptic lyrics of impending doom.

But there are flaws. Firstly, this album doesn’t really have the spark of the 70’s classics. It certainly might feel like an attempt to relive that era, but just doesn’t get there. Second, the riffs are mostly forgettable and lack distinctive elements. Thirdly, with the exception of “A Touch of Evil” all of the songs follow a similar trend: loud, fast and apocalyptic-ish. While some might not have an issue with this, others might eventually get bored with such a formula.

All in all, I have to commend the Priests for putting so much effort into this album. No matter how much some can find to criticize about it, it is still the fruit of hard labor. Plus, when taking into consideration how lackluster they’ve been ever since, then we come to realize that this is it: their last “need-to-hear” album, their last truly worthy album, the last album on which they cared to make kickass metal. Looking for a masterpiece? Jam Sad Wings of Destiny.
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Old 01-19-2014, 02:32 PM   #295
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the first few paragraphs sorta aren't needed. to we really need to know about what the past albums were like to understand this one? you actually don't talk about the music that much and Its hard to get an impression on what rating you think this album deserves. I mean, you only start really talking about the music in the last few paragraphs, which are all quite short.
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Old 01-19-2014, 03:34 PM   #296
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Yet more editing:

After the release of Ram It Down, Judas Priest were in a crisis. That album had suffered from mediocre songwriting. They had been recording for about a decade and a half and it seemed that they were worn out. Effectively, it looked like metal now belonged to a new generation, and the band was starting to look like a thing of the past. Keen on proving that they still had it in them, they released Painkiller.

Painkiller seems like an attempt to return to the band’s classic 70’s era. The band certainly sounds more metallic on here than they do on everything done from Hell Bent For Leather/Killing Machine to Ram It Down. Granted, Ram It Down had a metallic edge to it, but this album went even further.

The key change was on drums: Scott Travis replaced John Holland, who had served on more Priest studio albums than any other drummer up to that time (a grand total of 5). Travis would go on to equal Holland’s record, albeit in a poorer fashion, since every album after Painkiller with the arguable exception of Angel of Retribution pretty much sucked. But the importance of Travis lay in his emphasis on pure speed. His loud and fast style went in tune with the music on this new album. Although it’s the reviewer’s opinion that Travis is a tad overrated, particularly when compared to the likes of Les Binks and Simon Phillips, he nevertheless demonstrates some chops on here.

The opening title track begins with a nice drum solo which leads into the main riff. Once Halford begins singing, we know that this is a very different Priest album. The falsettos, the blistering guitar leads, the fast drumming, etc. Also of note is that this is somewhat of a loose concept album, filled with apocalyptic lyrics of impending doom.

As the record progresses, it feels consistent enough to hold the listener’s attention up to the end. Akin to a merciless beating on a boxing ring, Painkiller delivers a pummeling that should please many a metal fan. The one break in this drama is “A Touch Of Evil”, which has a slower pace but still feels suited to the album it’s in.

But there are flaws. Firstly, this album doesn’t really have the spark of the 70’s classics. It certainly might feel like an attempt to relive that era, but just doesn’t get there. Second, the riffs are mostly forgettable and lack distinctive elements. Thirdly, with the exception of “A Touch of Evil” all of the songs follow a similar trend: loud, fast and apocalyptic-ish. While some might not have an issue with this, others might eventually get bored with such a formula. Also, the track “All Guns Blazing” feels a bit unnecessary on the record; and Halford’s falsettos may prove annoying for some.

All in all, the band deserves credit for putting so much effort into this album. No matter how much some can find to criticize about it, it is still the fruit of hard labor. Plus, when taking into consideration how lackluster they’ve been ever since, then we come to realize that this is it: their last “need-to-hear” album, their last truly worthy album, the last album on which they cared to make kickass metal. Looking for a masterpiece? Jam Sad Wings of Destiny.
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Old 01-19-2014, 04:15 PM   #297
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First paragraph is pretty solid if you just totally delete this line

"That album had suffered from mediocre songwriting."


then I think this line is a bit awkward.

"His loud and fast style went in tune with the music on this new album."

try and rewrite that sentence.


this line also feels a bit awkward

"Also of note is that this is somewhat of a loose concept album, filled with apocalyptic lyrics of impending doom. "


and then same thing again, you still haven't talked about whats good about the album before you go into the "But there are flaws" section. work on that. the first few paragraphs are pretty solid now though
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Old 01-19-2014, 07:48 PM   #298
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Edited yet again:

After the release of Ram It Down, Judas Priest were in a crisis. They had been recording for about a decade and a half and it seemed that they were worn out. Effectively, it looked like metal now belonged to a new generation, and the band was starting to look like a thing of the past. Keen on proving that they still had it in them, they released Painkiller.

Painkiller seems like an attempt to return to the band’s classic 70’s era. The band certainly sounds more metallic on here than they do on everything done from Hell Bent For Leather/Killing Machine to Ram It Down. Granted, Ram It Down had a metallic edge to it, but this album went even further.

The key change was on drums: Scott Travis replaced John Holland, who had served on more Priest studio albums than any other drummer up to that time (a grand total of 5). Travis would go on to equal Holland’s record, albeit in a poorer fashion, since every album after Painkiller with the arguable exception of Angel of Retribution pretty much sucked. More importantly, Travis brought to the table a loud and fast style that went in sync with the new album’s direction. Although it’s the reviewer’s opinion that Travis is a tad overrated, particularly when compared to the likes of Les Binks and Simon Phillips, he nevertheless demonstrates some chops on here.

The opening title track begins with a nice drum solo which leads into the main riff. Once Halford begins singing, we know that this is a very different Priest album. The falsettos, the blistering guitar leads, the fast drumming, etc. Also of note is that this is a concept album, themed around an imaginary apocalypse.

As the record progresses, it feels consistent enough to hold the listener’s attention up to the end. Akin to a merciless beating on a boxing ring, Painkiller delivers a pummeling that should please many a metal fan. The one break in this drama is “A Touch Of Evil”, which has a slower pace but still feels suited to the album it’s in.

What’s good about this album is how consistent it is. With the exception of one track (which is mentioned in the next paragraph) every song works well enough. Also, the musicianship is very good, with pleasing guitar solos being a major highlight. As mentioned earlier, Travis’s drumming is very fast and has a major role on the album; even if he’s no virtuoso, he manages to deliver a very good performance. And Halford’s does an impressive job on vocals, even if they feel overdone at times.

But there are flaws. Firstly, this album doesn’t really have the spark of the 70’s classics. It certainly might feel like an attempt to relive that era, but just doesn’t get there. Second, the riffs are mostly forgettable and lack distinctive elements. Thirdly, with the exception of “A Touch of Evil” all of the songs follow a similar trend: loud, fast and apocalyptic-ish. While some might not have an issue with this, others might eventually get bored with such a formula. Also, the track “All Guns Blazing” feels a bit unnecessary on the record; and Halford’s falsettos may prove annoying for some.

All in all, the band deserves credit for putting so much effort into this album. No matter how much some can find to criticize about it, it is still the fruit of hard labor. Plus, when taking into consideration how lackluster they’ve been ever since, then we come to realize that this is it: their last “need-to-hear” album, their last truly worthy album, the last album on which they cared to make kickass metal. Looking for a masterpiece? Jam Sad Wings of Destiny.
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Old 01-20-2014, 04:31 AM   #299
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"went in sync with the new album’s direction"

change this to "that suited the new album's direction"


"Once Halford begins singing, we know that this is a very different Priest album. The falsettos, the blistering guitar leads, the fast drumming, etc"

elaborate on this a little bit. is it the fact that all these things aren't found on their previous albums that make this noteworthy?


delete this line

"(which is mentioned in the next paragraph)"


after that im not so sure. id say maybe try and get someone else to look it over, or just submit it and then ask for criticism from the review site. its fine if this is one of your first reviews, just keep on writing and submitting and you get better.
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Old 01-20-2014, 10:16 AM   #300
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Alrighty, will edit and submit.
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