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View Full Version : Scientists made two species to evolve in new one!


Noku
07-05-2006, 07:06 AM
Before it was thought that two separate species can't produce a fertile offspring. The new butterfly specie Heliconius heurippa is a combination of Heliconius cydno and Heliconius melpomene. It's "ancestors" are black winged butterflies from tropic, other has one white stripe in middle of it's wings and the other has red stripe. The new specie has both stripes.

Even though the new specie is able to mate with both butterflies they prefer to mate within their own specie which would in long run isolate their genepools and they wouldn't be able to produce healthy offspring at the point where their genepool has gotten too different due to further evolution.

coheneran
07-05-2006, 07:14 AM
I thought we knew we could create new species since that monk decided to mate green peas with yellow peas and make an army of peapods to control the world. Obviously he was a bit disappointed when he found out that mutant peas had no obvious superpowers.

Holy War
07-05-2006, 07:28 AM
Mendel :thumb:

Chrizzle fo' Shizzle
07-05-2006, 02:22 PM
Link? This sounds interesting and I want to learn more

wonder_steve
07-06-2006, 05:21 AM
Tiger trout are a mix of brook trout and brown trout.
Is this similar to what the threadstarter was talking on?

Steerpike
07-06-2006, 05:32 AM
Technically cross-species breeding is nothing new in genetic engineering, but it is still a relatively young branch of research.

PerpetualBurn
07-06-2006, 05:38 AM
Before it was thought that two separate species can't produce a fertile offspring.

Surely that's the very definition of a species. If they could produce fertile offspring, they would be the same species.

Can I have a link to where this has come from? Some details must be missing.

coheneran
07-06-2006, 10:25 AM
Gene Wars is all about mixing and matching old species to make new ones, and then using them to take out your enemy. It's a good game.

I thought that this cross-breeding thing is dangerous because it could create new diseases and theoretically potentially wipe out a previous species.

PerpetualBurn
07-06-2006, 11:55 AM
How would increased variation be a bad thing?

coheneran
07-07-2006, 07:56 PM
Apparantly cross-breeding (mostly between species than members of one genus family) is too dangerous because it could potentially cause mutations in the genes (the bad kind) and turn little problems or hereditary ailments into big trouble for either parent or new species. I guess it doesn't really matter in this case since the "parents" were both of the same genus family. It was more a side-comment than anything else.

Dinosawesome
07-08-2006, 08:24 AM
This isn't exactly ground breaking news- these things have been done previously by humans- sometimes on purpose (Mendel the pea-man) and sometimes accidently (ie, Ligers (http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_liger_hercules.htm))

thedeadwalk!
07-09-2006, 12:06 AM
I thought the news-worthy bit was that the new species could reproduce, not that a new species had been made? That's new to me.

Noku
07-12-2006, 12:10 PM
I read it from a local news paper. There should be article in Nature magazine... google is also a good friend.

Joey Hoser
07-12-2006, 06:33 PM
There was some dude in the Yukon or something that was hunting bears and killed what turned out to be a polar bear/grizzly bear cross.

Helmet
07-12-2006, 10:57 PM
There was some dude in the Yukon or something that was hunting bears and killed what turned out to be a polar bear/grizzly bear cross.

Yup, that was pretty interesting.

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12738644/?GT1=8199

Amit
07-13-2006, 02:55 AM
I thought we knew we could create new species since that monk decided to mate green peas with yellow peas and make an army of peapods to control the world. Obviously he was a bit disappointed when he found out that mutant peas had no obvious superpowers.

except there's a fairly big difference between the genetic tolerance for plants and animals

coheneran
07-13-2006, 03:43 AM
Yup, that was pretty interesting.

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12738644/?GT1=8199

Hahahaha, the first documented (and possible the only) case of a hybrid bear, and it gets killed by sports hunters. Isn't there some law against killing polar bears? And surely if this is one of a kind, they made a species go extinct. Bastards.

Smokey D
07-13-2006, 04:00 AM
It's happened before. That was just the first time it's been observed in a wild bear.

Dinosawesome
07-13-2006, 09:52 AM
Hahahaha, the first documented (and possible the only) case of a hybrid bear, and it gets killed by sports hunters. Isn't there some law against killing polar bears? And surely if this is one of a kind, they made a species go extinct. Bastards.
Technically it's only half a polar bear- so technically they should only have to pay half the fine.

Right?

ChickenStu
07-14-2006, 11:14 PM
Theres a clear difference between cross breeding and evolving.

YouGottaBeCrazy
07-15-2006, 07:52 AM
I thought the news-worthy bit was that the new species could reproduce, not that a new species had been made? That's new to me.

Yes.