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Bluewolf
03-05-2006, 09:45 PM
A few years ago my dad had a band and recorded a CD. He decided to go out and buy everything he needed to get everything recorded. I was never into playing music outside of Jazz band or Concert/marching band. Now I have some friends who play music and I've started to start playing drums again. I had played them a long time ago, but they lost my intrest. Anyways to my question. I have the following microphones going into a Roland VS-1680.
*Audio-Technica AT836
*Audio-Technica 350D
*Peavey PVM 38
*Audio-Technica PRO 2ax
*AKG OT 100
*Shure KSM32

I never really watched my dads band record, so I don't know how the mics were set up. I know the KSM32 was used as a vocal mic, but I don't know about the rest. I only need them for micing drums right now. Problem is I don't know what to use as overheads, what to use for snare, or anything. I'm thinking I'm gonna use the AT836 as my snare mic, but I dunno. I don't have two the same for overheads. Do they have to be the same? I think I might have some others, I just have to dig for them. Oh and drums were never mic'd for my dad's recordings because they couldn't find a drummer. They used a drum machine instead. Thank you.

KKKKKocaine
03-07-2006, 03:19 AM
A few years ago my dad had a band and recorded a CD. He decided to go out and buy everything he needed to get everything recorded. I was never into playing music outside of Jazz band or Concert/marching band. Now I have some friends who play music and I've started to start playing drums again. I had played them a long time ago, but they lost my intrest. Anyways to my question. I have the following microphones going into a Roland VS-1680.
*Audio-Technica AT836
*Audio-Technica 350D
*Peavey PVM 38
*Audio-Technica PRO 2ax
*AKG OT 100
*Shure KSM32

I never really watched my dads band record, so I don't know how the mics were set up. I know the KSM32 was used as a vocal mic, but I don't know about the rest. I only need them for micing drums right now. Problem is I don't know what to use as overheads, what to use for snare, or anything. I'm thinking I'm gonna use the AT836 as my snare mic, but I dunno. I don't have two the same for overheads. Do they have to be the same? I think I might have some others, I just have to dig for them. Oh and drums were never mic'd for my dad's recordings because they couldn't find a drummer. They used a drum machine instead. Thank you.


Audio-Technica AT836 - Dynamic mic, so it should be suitible for toms and snare.
Polar Pattern is cardioid (like most drum mics). Frequency response is 50Hz-17kHz.

Audio-Technica 350D - I have no idea. Probably a dynamic, so good for toms and snare.

Peavey PVM 38 - Dynamic, mostly a 'live' mic. Should be fine on snare and toms.


Audio-Technica PRO 2ax - General purpose dynamic mic, frequency response is 90hz to 13khz. Snare and toms again


AKG OT 100 - Dynamic designed for stage vocals and instrument pickup. Snares and toms.

Shure KSM32 - This one sticks out like a sore thumb. The other mics listed are mostly inexpensive mics / cheap live mics. Wheras this is a $500 (roughly) condenser mic and it's one of the few mics on the list still in production. This will be good for vocals, guitar amps and drum overheads. Don't stick it too close to anything extremely loud or you'll risk ripping the diaphragm inside the microphone.

As for miking the drum, it helps to have 2 indentical overheads, but you can easily get away with one. And I've heard some great and more importantly useable recordings done with just one condenser overhead and nothing else.
However, unless you have a really nice drumkit, some good mic experience and a decent room, I reccomend throwing a fair few mics at the kit.

Stick the pro 2ax on the snare.
The 836 and 350D on the rack toms.
The PVM 38 on the floor tom.
And then the AKG inside the kick drum.

Now none of these mics were designed to mic up kick drums, but you can get a decent sound from the kickdrum with the mics if you tinker with it. Play with different posistions inside the drum, the closer you are to where the beater strikes the head the more attack you get, the closer you are to the drums shell, the more tone you get. You'll probably want to get a mixture of the two that suits your own personal preference to the tone.

As for the overhead, place it facing down at the drums (aim for the middle) and leave a distance of about 4 feet between the highest drum and the condenser. (Leave more if you have your cymbals really high up as the cymbals will overpower the condenser, but be sure not to go too high up as it will weaken the overheads tone and your wax wings will melt in the blazing sun)

Hope that helped, if you have anymore questions just ask.

Bluewolf
03-07-2006, 03:49 PM
Thank you that helped a lot. :)

pitchfork
03-08-2006, 10:49 AM
Don't be surprised if you wreck the mic though, kick drums are evil on mics as i have found out before when we miced one up at a gig.