PDA

View Full Version : Carrer advice*real help would be much appreciated!


Dumpweedrock
02-15-2006, 10:27 AM
Hey guys, heres my dilema. I'm sixteen, i have been playing drums since i was 6, and i am currently in 2 bands, either of whihc i woul like to get some kind of indi label deal with.


So lately i have been thinking about what i want to do with my life and no matter what i just keep coming back to music. Now yeah, i know this sounds like every other 16 year old in the world, but i am serious and for real. No matter what it takes, i want to make a living out of music, wether it be playing with a band, being a studio drummer, being a sound engineeer or anything that involves me with music. Problem is i have no idea how to get prepared and even more so i have no idea where to look for opertunites once i am ready to begin in about 2-3 years.


So, if there is anyone out there who has any advice for me that would be great, i would love to hear form people who actualy work in the buessiness to maybye give me the story of how they got thier job so that i could see what i need to do. Please please help! I am very serious about this!!


if you need more info to help pm me or reply in this thread .

Thanks to anyonme that helps!


One of my ideas is to take lessons again, get to know reading music again, get to know a whole buch of different styles and become really good at all of them, then look in classifieds for bands that have a record deal but need a drummer to record/tour. Do you guys think that would work out? Also if it didn't work out, i could use the different styles i have learned and the ability to read music to become a studio drummer. How does that sound to you all ?

Atomic Rain
02-15-2006, 10:44 AM
you've got the right idea in become as diverse as possible if you want to be a session/temp drummer. Some music qualifications will do you good as well, whether they're in sound tech, drumming, or just pain "music".

Dumpweedrock
02-15-2006, 10:53 AM
So you are saying i should get a degree in somthing?
I thyink that might be a good idea so i will have somthing to fall back on if a temp band or a studio project falls through

Sardon
02-15-2006, 11:20 AM
Learn theory, Listen to different kind of music, play music, read about music.

Those are the things that propably got me where I am. I'm studying music engineering. It's a lot of fun to study something you like.

~kc~
02-15-2006, 11:32 AM
where do u live?

RushHourSoul
02-15-2006, 11:35 AM
Yeah, definatly learn theory. It's really important. Also learn new instruments, or at least try to understand what they're about etc. It will give you a greater perspective in a band situation. Being a 'studio' drummer is harder than it sounds anyway. You have to put in years and years of work to get yourself known. No ones going to pick this unknown dude over someone who has a very high reputation. You have to be friendly and easy to work with too, so maybe a course in people skills or something like that would be useful.

Go on to post-GCSE education, take something music related. I took Music and Music Technology A-Levels. I'm just finishing these courses now, and if all goes well i'll be going to university this autumn to start a degree in commercial music or music technology. Higher eduction is a good option not only because you learn a lot about the subject, and get to use quality equipment, but you also gain a lot of 'industry' contacts, as well as meet new people who you may end up forming a band with.

Just learn as much as you can, be motivated and focused, and you'll achieve your goal.

ADU Guitarist
02-15-2006, 11:56 AM
GO TO COLLEGE!!!!!!!!!

List of a few good music/audio production schools:
Berklee College of Music
Columbia College Chicago (It it ALL about passion there...)
Webster University (This is where I\'m attending next year)
Middle Tennessee State University


You def. need to go to college and get your degree in one or more of the following fields:
Music
Music Education
Audio Production (Sound Engineering)
etc.

airborne50caliber
02-15-2006, 12:08 PM
Session Drummer = Damn tioght, damn perfect, damn diverse. a lot of work.

What you can do now is practice as many styles as possible and get as good as you can, and get a good foundation in music theory and the like. It would also help to know something about recording. If you're not prepared to spend in a home setup (Which if you want to live off music is a good investment anyway, in my opinion), get on the internet and read all about recording. Get familiar with everything so when you come across the stuff it'll be much easier.

Trigger_003
02-17-2006, 12:05 AM
Doing grades is certainly going to help as well.

Harmonic_Wave
02-17-2006, 12:00 PM
Yeah, and education is the way to go. I got my degree in Audio Engineering and it's definitely helped me out.

airborne50caliber
02-17-2006, 12:36 PM
Can you tell me more about that, Harmonic Wave? I'm currently looking into the usefulness of degrees in the field of music production and recording.

Jovianknight
02-17-2006, 12:56 PM
Here's my advice to you, for whatever it is worth:

Don't think of getting signed to a label as the be-all and end-all of it. Save up, and buy yourself some equipment, and start recording yourself. That will only help your cause to being eventually signed to a label, but in the meantime you'll be creating songs and learning more and more stuff.

Also, be realistic and have a backup plan. Get a degree unless you're at a point where you know you'll be making enough money in music to survive.

moogoogaipan
02-17-2006, 01:14 PM
Also, be realistic and have a backup plan. Get a degree unless you're at a point where you know you'll be making enough money in music to survive.
sorry...this isn't meant to be an attack.

Don't listen to that garbage. If you believe in yourself then go for it. Don't get a back up degree... just go straight into it.
To me, a backup degree is like saying... I know i'm not going to succeed in music, so at least I have this. That's a really bad morale booster. But I mean, whatever floats your boat.

RushHourSoul
02-17-2006, 01:33 PM
yeah, choose your pathway and stick with it. Work hard and put in effort and it'll pay off.

Harmonic_Wave
02-17-2006, 03:26 PM
Can you tell me more about that, Harmonic Wave? I'm currently looking into the usefulness of degrees in the field of music production and recording.

It's actually a very useful degree. Recording engineers are ALWAYS looking to take on apprentices and although working for another engineer is a hard start (typically for no money) you begin to get more freedom within the studio and can take on projects of your own.

What was included in getting my degree was not only the technical stuff like microphones, studio setups, etc but there was so much more. We had sauldering classes to do studio repair, music theory, audio in video, and even music business classes that cover everything such as contracting, copyright, etc. I find that getting my degree opened a lot more doors for me and allowed me to do so much more.

If you want an idea of what it can do, currently I'm 20 and working as an independant recording engineer in Nova Scotia with my own fully portable studio setup as well as a huge setup at home. On the side I play music (2 bands) for fun and act as a Music Producer for bands as I took some production classes as well.

Atomic Rain
02-17-2006, 03:36 PM
Take up the saxaphone. It can't fail.


"So, you're a session drummer, right? :rolleyes:"

"I also play a mean sax."

"Oh wow! /money"

Jovianknight
02-17-2006, 03:44 PM
sorry...this isn't meant to be an attack.

Don't listen to that garbage. If you believe in yourself then go for it. Don't get a back up degree... just go straight into it.
To me, a backup degree is like saying... I know i'm not going to succeed in music, so at least I have this. That's a really bad morale booster. But I mean, whatever floats your boat.

Haha. Planning is bad. It's a good idea to plunge head first into something full-well knowing that only a fraction of musicians can ever make a living off of it. Just drop out of school now, my friend.

RushHourSoul
02-17-2006, 04:23 PM
It's actually a very useful degree. Recording engineers are ALWAYS looking to take on apprentices and although working for another engineer is a hard start (typically for no money) you begin to get more freedom within the studio and can take on projects of your own.

What was included in getting my degree was not only the technical stuff like microphones, studio setups, etc but there was so much more. We had sauldering classes to do studio repair, music theory, audio in video, and even music business classes that cover everything such as contracting, copyright, etc. I find that getting my degree opened a lot more doors for me and allowed me to do so much more.

If you want an idea of what it can do, currently I'm 20 and working as an independant recording engineer in Nova Scotia with my own fully portable studio setup as well as a huge setup at home. On the side I play music (2 bands) for fun and act as a Music Producer for bands as I took some production classes as well.

That sounds so awesome. Thats what I want to be like in 3 or so years when I come out of uni.

slickathenyou
02-17-2006, 06:38 PM
Haha. Planning is bad. It's a good idea to plunge head first into something full-well knowing that only a fraction of musicians can ever make a living off of it. Just drop out of school now, my friend.

How is that a morale booster? I think that's ****in worse. Unless it was sarcasm...
Here's what you do: A) (Smart decision) Go get a degree in something that you can always get a job in (Engineering, Doctorate, Accounting) then jump into music. Hell, you can still play music in college, and if you get a break in college, you can always go back, right? Prolly not, but its optimistic.
B) Go get as many visible tatoos as you can. You'll never get a regular job so you're forced to either join a gang or play music. Or bounce at clubs, but that doesn't count.

Trigger_003
02-17-2006, 09:56 PM
There are so many realms of musical careers that if you're serious about it and don't mind being flexible, you can be certain of getting some form of income from it.

It's like any career (unless your aim in life is to be a checkout chick or office assistant) - the going will probably be tough to successfully get to where you really want to be, but you can always settle for a compromise that works just as well. A lot of people are under the common misconception that to be a musician (as a career) means to be touring in a world-famous band. If this is the only form of musical career you will accept, sure, then you should go for some type of backup career as well. But think of all the of sound techs, recording techs, music teachers (both private and within the educational system), songwriters that sit in the background writing music for advertising companies, artists, etc., promoters, conductors/musical directors, managers - there are loads of branches out there. One of the most saught after positions is going to probably be instrument makers as many of them are within a 70 or so year old demographic. Once they're out, there will be a huge need for them. So if anyone tells you finding any sort of musical position will be hard...

The K had a huge list of all the types of musical careers there are... maybe he's found it? :hopeful:

airborne50caliber
02-18-2006, 02:02 AM
Stay round here, Harmonic wave..i might contact you in 2 years or so for advice :lol:

pitchfork
02-18-2006, 05:16 AM
Whatever you do get a degree in it, i want to be a session bassist or teach music either way its bloody helpful to have a degree.

Harmonic_Wave
02-18-2006, 09:41 AM
Stay round here, Harmonic wave..i might contact you in 2 years or so for advice :lol:

Lol. Sounds good. I'll be around here for a while so no worries, just hope the site is still up. Right now I'm tampering with my own site/forums so you can always reach me there (www.geocities.com/harmonic.wave <---Temp site) or by my email, harmonic.wave@gmail.com. I wish they allowed sigs on these forums. Anyways, anyone can feel free to contact me with projects, questions, etc.

Caleb3221
02-18-2006, 10:11 AM
I'm just going to state one opinion I hold regarding a "backup career".

I have two things that I really enjoy enough to make a career out of-music and IT stuff.

I'd much rather play music for a living, and I really hope/plan to.

But I still plan on getting a CS degree. Why?

I have absolutley no doubt that I CAN make money playing music-with the huge number/variety of jobs out there, there's gonna be somewhere I can work and make a living. But I am not certain that I could definatley get a job I ENJOY that is music related. You hear stories all the time of famous musicians who absolutely hate their lives by about halfway through. I've also talked to a number of professional musicians who aren't too happy since they are always playing for/working with idiots, etc. The backup career isn't as a fallback incase I fail in music, it's a fallback incase I stop enjoying music(Ultimatley, if I can make music but not make money off of it, and enjoy it more, I'd rather do that than make a living playing music I don't really like).

EDIT:Oh, I've also seen plenty of evidence that a degree isn't absolutley necessary: A teacher I study under, who's played in a number of bands and travels to do studio work a lot(Who also happens to be one of my favorite drummers, leading a number of great bands), is a history major(I think he even teachers music at a university now). One of my favorite bassists who's making a quite nice living both in cool bands and freelance work didn't go to college. It seems that ability is much more important than certifications in the field from the people I've talked to)

RushHourSoul
02-18-2006, 10:17 AM
I agree with that point caleb. Lets be realistic, the music business is very hard to get into, and then even harder to survive in. If you want commercial success and a major label contract, its going to very hard and the chances are extremely slim. Putting all your eggs in one basket is a pretty big risk. Just be prepared incase you don't make it and you're stuck with no career plan.

KKKKKocaine
02-18-2006, 04:59 PM
The K had a huge list of all the types of musical careers there are... maybe he's found it? :hopeful:

I don't think I've got it anymore. But it's alot because the music industry is alot more than people assume. Most people just look at session musicians, label owners, recording engineers and musicians and then leave it at that. There are a whole heap of ways to get into music careers, they're not neccessarily as musically creative as you may want, but it's a long list.
I might post some more when I'm in a better mood to give some advice, but meh.

Trigger_003
02-18-2006, 05:25 PM
Ah, that's a shame. T'was a good one :).