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Marty Friedman Is God
12-03-2005, 07:46 AM
This is kind of an odd question. My band, Polaris, uses a very cinematic style of music, music that reflects the lyrical content. We want to write a song about a friend who started go-go dancing a pole in an alcoholic stupour. What's typical strip-tease music? Give us a few suggestions.

HitHardDrums55
12-03-2005, 08:12 AM
whenever i think of music to fit that sort of thing for some reason i always think funky, maybe a little bit mellow?

Ned
12-04-2005, 12:34 AM
This is kind of an odd question. My band, Polaris, uses a very cinematic style of music, music that reflects the lyrical content. We want to write a song about a friend who started go-go dancing a pole in an alcoholic stupour. What's typical strip-tease music? Give us a few suggestions.

That probably depends on the era. At the local "burlesque" club, the girls themselves choose records to collect one-dollar bills by, and the DJ spins the records for them. There are mostly normal rock songs with an emphasis on supposedly "sexy" or sexually provocative lyrics, but sometimes there are just songs an individual girl happens to like. In the old days, apparently, the clubs hired actual live bands that tried to provide appropriate accompaniment. The most famous putative strip-tease piece is, of course, "The Stripper", which was an instrumental hit in, I'm guessing, the early sixties. I don't know if it was ever used in a strip club, but it's probably a good introduction to the classic style--a thing of the past.

Ned
12-04-2005, 12:40 AM
Okay, I googled "The Stripper", and this is what I came up with:

"In 1958, David Rose wrote 'The Stripper' for a television show called 'Burlesque', starring Dan Dailey. The tape sat for several years until MGM asked Rose to record 'Ebb Tide' to cash in on its use in the film, 'Sweet Bird of Youth'. They looked around the tape library and slapped 'The Stripper' on the B-side. Los Angeles DJ Robert Q. Lewis decided one night to play 'The Stripper' over and over, no matter what his listeners asked for. Word of this stunt got out and soon other DJs were imitating Lewis, and the exposure won an audience for the record. For a guy who specialized in strings, Rose seemed somehow to be able to reach down and summon up the epitome of the sleazy brass sound of the strip joint. The record sold over two million copies and got a second boost when Noxema made it the theme for a series of shaving cream commercials featuring suggestive voice-overs by a Swedish actress....[Mr. Rose also wrote the] 1944 hit, 'Holiday for Strings', or as we all know and love it, 'that shopping song' [and] contributed one of television's most memorable themes for 'Bonanza'....He continued to work in television, serving as musical director for the series 'Little House on the Prairie' in the late 1970s and early 1980s."

JonM
12-04-2005, 08:24 AM
Nah son you gotta get CRUNK like we do in the ATL.

Ned
12-07-2005, 08:50 PM
Anyway, to make a long story short, I think if you set your song fifty or more years in the past you can use this sort of stereotypical stripper music, and pretty much everyone will get the connection (there is some danger of heavy hand making the thing too corny though), but if you set your song in the present you're fairly out of luck.

pendrightheloved1
12-08-2005, 04:51 PM
I always think the music in Bob Dylan - Everybody must get stoned sounds really sleazy and stripperish.

Or Pour some sugar on me - def leppard

bamboomonkey
12-09-2005, 01:56 PM
I recommend that you listen to 'The Girls Of Porn' by Mr. Bungle. I'm guessing that it has that sort of sleazy-funk sound that you're looking for....

trunkshope6
12-10-2005, 01:13 PM
Wait a minut your band name is Polaris,the Polaris that wrote music for Pete and Pete??

The Minstrel in the Gallery
12-11-2005, 08:29 AM
Wait a minut your band name is Polaris,the Polaris that wrote music for Pete and Pete??

Yeah I've been watching Pete and Pete on DVD and the band that does all the music is called Polaris.