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verve
11-12-2005, 08:12 PM
I have been playing drums for about four years
I have a show in about a month.
Itís going to be a recital type setting that is supposed to showcase me.
there will only be a very small group, maybe only drums and keyboard.
So my question isÖ

can any of you think of any not too complicated jazz songs that could really showcase the drummer?

Thanks

HitHardDrums55
11-12-2005, 09:34 PM
improvise crazy jazz fills with the basic swing rythm

zfmt
11-12-2005, 11:08 PM
ya, what I do is play the beat, but I rotate drums. like I would make a beat play it on snare only, then play with one of my hands on the ride cymbal, then modify the beat till it sounds good, then I would go back to the snare thing and hit the toms in the pattern.

(my grammer sucks tonight, I hope you understand what im saying)

dj_ando
11-13-2005, 03:57 AM
sing sing sing is more of a big band tune, i wouldn't recommend it for a trio.

try something like take five, joe morello really shines in that song. but really, you can stick a solo into any jazz tune, just take a couple of choruses. are you not willing to take a solo?

Chameleon
11-13-2005, 05:36 AM
Both suggestions are excellent, fun tunes for drums. But as said, Sing Sing Sing would probably sound pretty dire as a trio...

If your pianist is good you could try Birdland. It's originally by Weather Report but various people have done great versions of it that are much more jazzy. Maynard Ferguson for one. It would work best if you had a good bassist as well.

Caleb3221
11-13-2005, 08:06 AM
You could try a simple blues song or something. You wouldn't have to worry about following odd form movements when soloing, you can just go at it.

stoned_rat
11-15-2005, 01:17 AM
play birdland by the buddy rich big band....however you may need a little more than a trio....but a great song all the same.

Toolboy
11-16-2005, 11:25 AM
Both suggestions are excellent, fun tunes for drums. But as said, Sing Sing Sing would probably sound pretty dire as a trio...

If your pianist is good you could try Birdland. It's originally by Weather Report but various people have done great versions of it that are much more jazzy. Maynard Ferguson for one. It would work best if you had a good bassist as well.

? Birdland was originally a big band tune before Weather Report did their fusion version.

I think "Four" is a good tune, you can play it pretty fast and theres loads of room for solos. Miles Davis did a pretty good version if you can find it.

dwguru
11-18-2005, 08:57 AM
Listen, if U have only been playing for four years U need to take a step back and evaluate yourself. Don't listen to any of these guys, sorry folks, but U can't learn "Birdland" or "Take Five" in just a few months...If U can then U R a genius... Not to offend any one but I have studied playing Jazz solos for a long time, "Take Five" took me almost a year to full be able to play and present the nessasary shading the way Morello did. It is the one of the first forums to highlight a drum solo in 5/4 sig. Quite complicated, and "Birdland"? Ha ha ha... Kid, don't bother...
As I said evaluate yourself, what I mean by that is, U need to look at your strenths and your weeknesses. Close your eyes, and imagine playing by yourself, listen to your solo, do what U do best, and enjoy...Soloing is not about technical skill or speed, it is about beeing able to have your audience relate to what U R playing, U need to be able to play and present freedom of your life. Incorperate it with what U do best behind your kit, do what U R comfortable with, DON"T try any new tricks...Like I said do what U do best and your audience will respond...:thumb:

dj_ando
11-18-2005, 09:23 AM
i've been playing for 5 years, and i recently played take five for my biggest practical music exam to date, in my school finals. turned out great. you don't need to play like morello, a solo is about self expression, not imitation. in fact, you don't need to pay any attention to joe's solo if you want to come up with something different. the important thing about take five, in my eyes, is that you play it musically and melodically, and you make the odd time signature sound like second nature. just get that ride grooving and you'll be set.

Caleb3221
11-18-2005, 02:40 PM
dwguru: 'you" is not that much harder to type out than U. Think of it. a U requires 2 keystrokes, a shift and a u. "you" requires 3, and dosen't make youlook like an idiot. I have to really force myself to take you seriously.

Even when I do, I disagree. As stated, you don't even have to know what morello plays. To play exactly his solo would almost be against the spirit of jazz.

Ned
11-19-2005, 12:13 AM
dwguru: 'you" is not that much harder to type out than U. Think of it. a U requires 2 keystrokes, a shift and a u. "you" requires 3, and dosen't make you look like an idiot. I have to really force myself to take you seriously. Thanks.

Even when I do, I disagree. As stated, you don't even have to know what morello plays. To play exactly his solo would almost be against the spirit of jazz. You're right here too, but I think we should allow that there is at least some educational value in learning Morello's solo note-for-note. There is some educational value in learning it dynamic-shading-for-dynamic-shading as well--it all depends how much effort you want to devote to one solo, which ought to be up to you.

dj_ando
11-19-2005, 02:05 AM
when playing live jazz, people don't want to hear solos reproduced note for note - or at least i never would. the thing about jazz that attracts so many listeners is the spontaneity in improvisation, and the freedom self expression the music allows. sure, it's great to listen to original recordings of solos and keep coming back to them and enjoying them, but i would expect to see something different in a live situation. of course it would be great to learn morello's solo the way it was originally played, as you're exploring some new avenues of solo structuring and the development of ideas, but i still think it's something you'd do in your own time for your own self, not to for performance purposes.

Ned
11-19-2005, 02:39 AM
when playing live jazz, people don't want to hear solos reproduced note for note - or at least i never would. the thing about jazz that attracts so many listeners is the spontaneity in improvisation, and the freedom self expression the music allows. sure, it's great to listen to original recordings of solos and keep coming back to them and enjoying them, but i would expect to see something different in a live situation. of course it would be great to learn morello's solo the way it was originally played, as you're exploring some new avenues of solo structuring and the development of ideas, but i still think it's something you'd do in your own time for your own self, not to for performance purposes.

Sure. Two contrary points, however: 1) There are a considerable number of cases in which very prominent jazz group leaders insisted certain of their soloists strictly reproduce recorded improvisations for live audiences--which is not to suggest that this is good aesthetic practice; it has historically been sound showbiz practice, or so it would seem. 2) We don't know the nature of the thread-starter's "recital"--although I must confess I'd actually forgot all about that when I made my previous post, and I wasn't thinking then about any kind of performance before an audience at all.

Chameleon
11-19-2005, 04:39 AM
? Birdland was originally a big band tune before Weather Report did their fusion version.


Eh? No it's not. Original composer is Joe Zawinul from Weather Report. They played it first. Since then tonnes of people have covered it, but it's a WR tune.

BassVirtuoso
11-19-2005, 11:50 AM
Eh? No it's not. Original composer is Joe Zawinul from Weather Report. They played it first. Since then tonnes of people have covered it, but it's a WR tune.

Get back in the bass forum before I take off my belt.

Acid Jazz by John McLaughlin....mmmm those drums.

Chameleon
11-19-2005, 12:32 PM
Get back in the bass forum before I take off my belt.

Acid Jazz by John McLaughlin....mmmm those drums.

:naughty: Yes sir!

some jive turkey
11-29-2005, 10:07 PM
Jazz is what you make it. Do any song, hard or easy, any way you want, but do everyone with a set of ears a favor and make it interesting.

As for suggestions off the top of my head, maybe Footprints? It's a good one for a drummer to trade fours on, therefore bypassing the "hey look how fu<king cool I am" type of drum solo approach.