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insaynewrapper
10-30-2005, 05:09 PM
I've seen a few threads on here where people post a snare drum solo. Am I the only one who gets bored with that kind of thing? I mean yeah, I can appreciate the technique behind it, but what practical application does it have? It just seems like learning something for the sake of learning it.

Bone
10-30-2005, 05:25 PM
When you interanlize the reality of what your body is doing while playing drums. Rudimental work will become exciting again.

To help you on the path -

Take any snare drum solo, take your favorite 4 bar phrase. Now go to your drum set. Play that 4 bar phrase, keep your left hand on the snare and move your right hand around the toms.

See where this goes?

Jezen
10-30-2005, 05:48 PM
I simply love snare solos.

Wait...No. I love the sound of the whole drumline. Thats where it's at!

darkevent89
10-30-2005, 06:30 PM
Personally for me, I really don't like being in school concert bands. Nor the drumline. I like being the only drummer behind a kit.

Det_Nosnip
10-31-2005, 12:43 PM
See post #2.

gibsonmaniac
11-11-2005, 09:33 AM
snare drum work is really exciting to listen to. It is so dynamic with so many rudimental work. In my opinion, the people who do not apreciate snare drum solo's would be the group of people who are only used to hearing the whole ensemble of a "rock" drum kit, and do not fully Appreciate the technique, and sheer excitement that can be heard inthe solo snare drum. If you listen to a pipe band, the snare drum line would be VERY similare to that of a High School marching band drum line, although the technique, rudiments, and speed of playing are much, much more advanced and difficult to learn. I am in a pipe band drum corpes and it took me 4 years to be good enough to be able to play in competition, this, infact is quite quick.

So if you just give it a chance and really put some thought behind it, snare drum playing is infact, VERY exciting to listen to especially when the scores and tight and very dynamic, and of course. the VITAL element, all the drummers play in sync! (",)

cheers!!!!

jalel
11-11-2005, 10:35 AM
If you can be creative and sound excellent with just a sanre drum, you open up a universe of possibilities (sp?) on the drum set. Like Bone said, you can take any sticking pattern and move it between the hands and feet, orchestrating it amongst different drums and cymbals. You can even change the values of the notes along with what drums/cymbals are played (or aren't played, should you decide to throw in a rest). The end result: a simple rrlrll pattern can be turned into a near infinite amount of grooves and fills.

crolfe1
11-11-2005, 11:45 AM
Adding dynamics to any snare solo will make it that much more interesting. Its not only the notes you're playing, but how you play them. Not only will this add interest to a snare solo, it will develop a feel. And feel is the basis for grooving.

Motleyguy
11-11-2005, 02:02 PM
snare drum work is really exciting to listen to. It is so dynamic with so many rudimental work. In my opinion, the people who do not apreciate snare drum solo's would be the group of people who are only used to hearing the whole ensemble of a "rock" drum kit, and do not fully Appreciate the technique, and sheer excitement that can be heard inthe solo snare drum. If you listen to a pipe band, the snare drum line would be VERY similare to that of a High School marching band drum line, although the technique, rudiments, and speed of playing are much, much more advanced and difficult to learn. I am in a pipe band drum corpes and it took me 4 years to be good enough to be able to play in competition, this, infact is quite quick.

So if you just give it a chance and really put some thought behind it, snare drum playing is infact, VERY exciting to listen to especially when the scores and tight and very dynamic, and of course. the VITAL element, all the drummers play in sync! (",)

cheers!!!!


man, what band do you play with and where? I play with RMM 3 in BC, Canada.

AdictAddict
11-12-2005, 01:47 PM
Adding dynamics to any snare solo will make it that much more interesting. Its not only the notes you're playing, but how you play them. Not only will this add interest to a snare solo, it will develop a feel. And feel is the basis for grooving.
yeah, between different parts of the snare, dynamics, rimshots, cross sticking, etc. there are many different sounds you can get out of a snare.

Det_Nosnip
11-12-2005, 10:51 PM
I simply love snare solos.

Wait...No. I love the sound of the whole drumline. Thats where it's at!

Nah...it's all about the jazz snare solo! Although I give total props to what drumlines can do and pretty much hold them up as having the best hand chops in the world, I find a nice and smooth, improvised, loose and groovy jazz solo much more appealing.

FockerTheLopper
11-12-2005, 11:27 PM
See post number 5

moogoogaipan
11-13-2005, 12:12 AM
I've seen a few threads on here where people post a snare drum solo. Am I the only one who gets bored with that kind of thing? I mean yeah, I can appreciate the technique behind it, but what practical application does it have? It just seems like learning something for the sake of learning it.

That is not farther from the truth. Learning for the sake is learning is great...I do that a lot, but this is essential....learning for the sake of learning to play properly.
If you take time to notice...all great drummers have a wide variety of knowledge... if you asked them a theory a question, most of the them could probably go into a lot of detail. My point is...if you choose to not learn something that you don't think is useful, you will regret it later when you find out just how useful it is. Never ever underestimate the value of snare soloing. Everything on set, is extrapolated from snare rudiments...that's just how it is.

gibsonmaniac
11-14-2005, 01:57 PM
man, what band do you play with and where? I play with RMM 3 in BC, Canada.

hey hows it goin!! i play with st. lawrence howth, in dublin, ireland!!! small world ey!!

Jezen
11-14-2005, 04:15 PM
^^^
Wtf? :confused:

Motleyguy
11-14-2005, 04:16 PM
Yeah man, this is the first time I've come across another pipe bander on MX though. What grade does your band play?

flyguy
11-14-2005, 05:30 PM
That is not farther from the truth. Learning for the sake is learning is great...I do that a lot, but this is essential....learning for the sake of learning to play properly.
If you take time to notice...all great drummers have a wide variety of knowledge... if you asked them a theory a question, most of the them could probably go into a lot of detail. My point is...if you choose to not learn something that you don't think is useful, you will regret it later when you find out just how useful it is. Never ever underestimate the value of snare soloing. Everything on set, is extrapolated from snare rudiments...that's just how it is.

yeah man. ^

snare solos are excellent because its just the bare basics of drumming, ...rudiments! When you develope a control for these rudiments you will quickly find yourself applying them to the drum set in musical situations. Just as a piano players needs to learn scales a drummer must learn basic rudiments. I dont see how you wouldnt want to learn them.

Massik Kretal
11-14-2005, 06:23 PM
Yo i want a snare solo pronto. Someone find me a relatively easy marching snare solo. + rep!!

Motleyguy
11-14-2005, 09:01 PM
yeah man. ^

snare solos are excellent because its just the bare basics of drumming, ...rudiments! When you develope a control for these rudiments you will quickly find yourself applying them to the drum set in musical situations. Just as a piano players needs to learn scales a drummer must learn basic rudiments. I dont see how you wouldnt want to learn them.

rudiments = essential. Absolutely the most important thing to know and master in the realm of drumming, groove and feel take a close second though.

Det_Nosnip
11-15-2005, 12:24 AM
Yo i want a snare solo pronto. Someone find me a relatively easy marching snare solo. + rep!!

Here's a million:

http://www.rudimentaldrumming.com/

isp_of_doom
11-15-2005, 01:55 AM
cheers for that link Ted, I was just about to ask for something like that (and thanks Massik Kretal for asking for it!)

gibsonmaniac
11-16-2005, 01:31 PM
Yeah man, this is the first time I've come across another pipe bander on MX though. What grade does your band play?

we play grade 4a. ur in da g3 rmm yea? i heard the juvinile band at the worlds they were practising beside us, and i SWEAR i thought it was the grade 2 band! they were awsome!!

Motleyguy
11-17-2005, 12:13 AM
Yep, I just made the cut in their this fall...but that's the band that won juvenile. It's intense man.

nonsense!
11-17-2005, 05:08 AM
I understand the topic creator's point. A snare drum solo is cool, impressive, and dynamc-- when you're playing for other drummers. I highly suggest learning the different parts of one. Unfortunately:

The people listening to a recording of it or watching at a show unfortunately do not care. Except other drummers, but you want to play for your whole audience not 2 drummers in it.

Jezen
11-17-2005, 12:51 PM
^^^^
That's what showmanship is for.



I'm still trying to nail that flam etude, but im struggling. I can do all of it with ease, except that damned second bar!

Jbdrummin4u
11-18-2005, 09:10 PM
I've seen a few threads on here where people post a snare drum solo. Am I the only one who gets bored with that kind of thing? I mean yeah, I can appreciate the technique behind it, but what practical application does it have? It just seems like learning something for the sake of learning it.

Are you talking marching or concert, marching Im assuming? Thats what most solos are on... You can learn SOOOO much from snare solos. When you do a solo, try and stay as consistant as possible, keep your tips down, Stopping your stick closer to the head on staccato notes etc. You can never know enough and be good enough to stop playing solos.

Det_Nosnip
11-19-2005, 12:24 AM
I understand the topic creator's point. A snare drum solo is cool, impressive, and dynamc-- when you're playing for other drummers. I highly suggest learning the different parts of one. Unfortunately:

The people listening to a recording of it or watching at a show unfortunately do not care. Except other drummers, but you want to play for your whole audience not 2 drummers in it.

Here's where I disagree with you: your assumption that the opinions of those people actually matter at all. I don't play for "my whole audience," nor do I play for the "2 drummers in it." Although having people enjoy what I play is definitely a great feeling, I play for one person and one person alone: myself. Or, to take a more metaphysical approach, I play intrinsically for the music itself. There is nothing more important than that. Trying to play a certain way because you think more people will enjoy you is a waste of time...all that you will end up doing is sounding like somebody else. If your music is to be worth anything at all, it has to come from you.

insaynewrapper
11-19-2005, 01:27 AM
Well this was certainly very enlightening. I appreciate everybody's posts! I'm gonna go learn one :-).
Cheers!

Fabrizzio
12-07-2005, 10:23 PM
i think post 27 wins this one. :chug: