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View Full Version : Do you believe in "finding your own technique"?


scorpion990
10-30-2005, 03:43 PM
I've been taking lessons for a while, and my teacher was rather picky on how I hold my stick, when I let go of it, etc.

I see lots of other drummers playing nicely, but they hold the stick very wrong, don't drop their fingers when they hit a drum, etc. I still struggle to do everything correctly when doing a double stroke roll. I can easily do it if I hold the sticks in a comfortable way for me, though.

So, do you believe in finding what's comfortable for you and using it, or struggling to become an expert on what has worked for others in the past?

My drum teacher tells me that people who hold the sticks wrong (etc.) might sound good now, but there is only so much they can do, and that one day, doing that will limit their playing. So, is he right? Thanks!

fatcow2000
10-30-2005, 03:45 PM
my teacher said the same thing to me... i used to have my hands like i was punching the drums... that changed... correct technique helps you last longer, its like sex.

ive seen a lot of drummers who have ****ty technique during shows... sometimes it pisses me off to the point where i want to tell them, but i forget...

GooseFilms.net
10-30-2005, 03:56 PM
I guess I believe in finding technique that suits you, reasonably. If you're using the stick in a way that works well and isn't damaging to you or your set, great.
For instance, there are tons of different embouchure styles for trumpet. Some work better for others, some worse. My teacher told me of a new student he has, serious about playing trumpet. He claims that he used to have a solid double F (4th space above the staff, thats an impressive note for a high school player), until his old teacher imposed a seldom-used jazz embouchure on him. A year later, his range had plummeted from a strong F to a weak G, almost a full octave.

If you're doing something with your instrument that works, use it. If it's not broken, don't fix it.

CasB
10-30-2005, 03:59 PM
There isn't a grip that is perfect. And I know from myself that I've changed my grip since I started playing. Since I don't take lessons I figured it out myself, well...it feels kinda natural now...
So I guess you can create your own technique, and a lot of pro drummers never took lessons, and you don't hear anyone say that they don't have a proper technique.

Bone
10-30-2005, 04:01 PM
To the extent and bounds that govern "good technique" - That is technique that will not produce injuries from playing.

There is room for variation inside those bounds that occurs from personal preference, hand size, body type so on and such.

DxRocker
10-30-2005, 04:43 PM
Find your own style? yes...
Find your own technique? maybe... techniques come from somewhere... Somebody needs to invent them right? But for the time being, stick to what has been done before, try to master those and if you become a Dave Weckle or a Vinni C one day, you might want to try and take it a step further :D

Massik Kretal
10-30-2005, 04:50 PM
Different things work for different people. Hand technique seems to be very consistent between people becuase that is the best way to do it. Like Bone said there is room for variations in the boundaries of good techinque.

Foot technique seems different to me though. Like my teacher plays with his feet very mid-low on the pedals or should I say far back. I play mid-high on mine but thats just me. I can still play perfectly fine and am still improving chops and so on. I dont see my technique getting limited.

Dookiedude3005
10-30-2005, 05:56 PM
^^^ Opeth is friggin' awesome, they're playing near where I live right now, i was supposed to go but i couldn't:upset:

I'm always changing my set ups and tensions on ym bass drum pedal to find just the right set up.

Not everyone can play a standard 5pc kit or learn to play with all the drums perfectly flat, you gotta find your own way. As long as the way you play doesn't affect your health or damages your playing style short or long term, perfectly fine.

ThugsRook
10-30-2005, 06:04 PM
usually when it comes to stick technique ~ you will get blisters if youre doing it wrong. so if youre not getting blisters you must be doing something right.

:wave:

dj_ando
10-30-2005, 06:29 PM
the problem is, there is a fine line between good and bad technique, and if you get yourself into any bad habbits they will be very difficult for you to spot (because it will feel natural) and difficult to break. if your teacher is being very forceful in what he's doing though, and something doesn't feel right then you might need to find a compromise. try out whatever he says to do for a few weeks, and if it still doesn't feel right to you then make some adjustments.

in the end, your body is your best teacher. this is not to say you should do everything on your own, but once you're shown the 'correct' way to do things, be very conscious of how your body reacts - if you feel tension playing with a new grip or whatever the case may be.

Double Bass Jim
10-30-2005, 06:42 PM
There is room for variation inside those bounds that occurs from personal preference, hand size, body type so on and such.
Yea everyone has their own little quirks, as long as your not doing damage to your body then I see it as acceptable.

poppinfresh
10-30-2005, 06:44 PM
usually when it comes to stick technique ~ you will get blisters if youre doing it wrong. so if youre not getting blisters you must be doing something right.

:wave:

thats very true, i always held my sticks the way my teacher told me and then one day magically, everything was perfect. I could hit everything really fast and i hit everything really gently and was still able to pull out the volume, but i was like holy ****, this is what good technique is. So yes in a way i found my technique, but when you have it right you will notice but its a lot different than gripping it confortably. If that was unclear please ask questions im not very good with words and senteences,

Seahawk
10-30-2005, 07:19 PM
my stick control and overall technique got amazingly better when i joined my schools drum line as a snare.

Happy_Squirrel
10-30-2005, 09:09 PM
There's a reason why the techniques that have been accepted as "correct" are taught by so many teachers. They're the best techniques for maximizing control while lessoning the risk of chronic injury. The first year that I played I was self-taught and had (unbeknownst to me) horrible technique. My wrists hurt all the time and I couldn't play fast without getting cramps in my hands and forearms. I started taking lessons and my techer immediately pointed out several flaws in my technique and I slowly started to play properly. Now I have much better control, better endurance and my hands and wrists never hurt.

Just because a famous drummer has improper technique doesn't mean that it's OK. Learn proper technique and then find your own style.

Massik Kretal
10-30-2005, 09:12 PM
^^^ Opeth is friggin' awesome, they're playing near where I live right now, i was supposed to go but i couldn't:upset:

I'm gonna see them tommorow :D

thenewguy515
10-30-2005, 10:16 PM
usually when it comes to stick technique ~ you will get blisters if youre doing it wrong. so if youre not getting blisters you must be doing something right.

:wave:
i used to get blisters alot when i first started playing(about 6 months ago) but not so much anymore, i don' have a teacher really, my stepdad plays but all he really showed me was how the timing works and the really basic beat thingy(i can't tab it but u all know what i'm talking about) i can't get the lines lined up with the letters, but top line is hi hat. middle is bass, bottom is snare.
|o-o-o-o
|o------
|----o--
i just taught myself everything else, i never practice rudiments i know it's bad but i just like to play with songs it's way funner

FockerTheLopper
10-30-2005, 10:25 PM
Comfort is number one, listen to your teacher though, he ultimately knows what best(unless he sucks). If your uncomfortable(if you can't play then I guess you need to get used to) tell him and he'll try something else. My teacher took my sticks away from my hands and made me stand naturally he then slipped my sticks into my hand told me to grip and thats how I should hold them and play. That was my past grip and if you didn't already know I take pride in my grip so that helped my grip ego :cool:

ThugsRook
10-30-2005, 10:38 PM
i just taught myself everything else, i never practice rudiments i know it's bad but i just like to play with songs it's way funner
thats fine, thats prolly why you started playing to begin with and there is nothing wrong with that. eventually your thirst for more knowledge will lead you back to rudiments, but by then youll prolly be able todo (and unknowingly doing) most if not all of them anyways.

i had a teacher my first year and he taught me alot. but i can honestly say i learned almost everything i know from john bonham. playing led zeppelin songs (correctly) will teach a beginer alot of very useful techniques, and they wont even realize it :lol:

:wave:

dumbassdrummer
10-30-2005, 10:43 PM
Thugs, I hear you. I've taught myself alot by watching and listening to others, but at the same time, consider - if we've been able to learn this much without a real teacher, how much could we have learned with one?

That's why I support getting a teacher.

ThugsRook
10-31-2005, 12:31 AM
Thugs, I hear you. I've taught myself alot by watching and listening to others, but at the same time, consider - if we've been able to learn this much without a real teacher, how much could we have learned with one?

That's why I support getting a teacher.
oh yes i suggest a teacher too.

in my first year i would learn stuff and not understand what it was exactly that i was doing, but i could do it. my teacher would explain to me what i was doing and of course there was a rudiment for it too. understanding will make you a better player :)

what im trying to say is ~ you need both cause neither one alone can teach you everything.

:wave:

Bryan Blakey
10-31-2005, 01:36 AM
I've been taking lessons for a while, and my teacher was rather picky on how I hold my stick, when I let go of it, etc.

I see lots of other drummers playing nicely, but they hold the stick very wrong, don't drop their fingers when they hit a drum, etc. I still struggle to do everything correctly when doing a double stroke roll. I can easily do it if I hold the sticks in a comfortable way for me, though.

So, do you believe in finding what's comfortable for you and using it, or struggling to become an expert on what has worked for others in the past?

My drum teacher tells me that people who hold the sticks wrong (etc.) might sound good now, but there is only so much they can do, and that one day, doing that will limit their playing. So, is he right? Thanks!

The first thing my drum teacher told me was that he wasn't going to show me how to hold a stick or tell me what's right or wrong, because what's right is whatever is comfortable.

Double Bass Jim
10-31-2005, 01:41 AM
because what's right is whatever is comfortable.
Not if you get CTS.

There are things that can hurt you VERY much. It's so important to have your technique evaulated from a 3rd person perspective... Aomeone who really knows what their doing and knows the health and physics behind good grip.

Bone
10-31-2005, 02:37 AM
The first thing my drum teacher told me was that he wasn't going to show me how to hold a stick or tell me what's right or wrong, because what's right is whatever is comfortable.

Of all the things...


Words can simply not express the utter stupidity of such statements.

crolfe1
10-31-2005, 02:44 AM
Here's one for you...

"The driving instructor told me to sit anyway I wanted while driving a car. So I got in and decided to recline my seat most of the way back, and fold one of my legs up on my knee. While running through a red light, I did becasue he told me I can drive anyway I wanted too, I was hit head on and now my leg is folded behind my head and broken in 19 places."

You have to start with a correct technique, a healthy one, then modify it slightly to the produce the best feel.

J0llyhunter
10-31-2005, 12:19 PM
definitely

-Obscurity-
10-31-2005, 12:27 PM
I found my own technique. It involves a martini and a mickey. And occasionaly some rope.

LittlePound
10-31-2005, 05:37 PM
i think that everyone has their own interpretation of "technique". No one is going to play exactly the same, not even those people in the blue devils or cavaliers can do that. It's more of your own style to that technique. The reason we have techniques is becuase they work, and it'd be stupid just to decided not to use something that works just so you can do what feels more "comfortable". You'll get comfortable playing with right technique after awhile so just use the technique your teacher tells you and put your own little swing to it.

Caleb3221
10-31-2005, 05:41 PM
Alot of people seem to say "whatever is comfortable". This is true to an extent, but most good techinques are awkward and unnatural when first starting. It takes a bit of practice to get them cemented in your head and comfortable. One case where this is ALWAYS true is brushes. They never feel natural, to anyone. But, the awkward, uncomfortable movements soon become second nature, and you learn to love them. Same with techinque. No one initially feels comfortable holding their sticks completley loosely. No one initially feels comfortable in German grip(or even American)(Or mabye even french for some)(Not that it is necessarily the best, just an example)

The syllek attacks
10-31-2005, 07:00 PM
I think you need to learn proper technique and then find a variation that fits, like I learned in marching band a hard German, but when I play set I let my wrist twist a little to give a little extra comfort.