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View Full Version : So, do you mostly practice playing music or rudiments?


nametaken
10-28-2005, 11:08 PM
Ive been taking lessons for about a month now. 90% of it has been rudiments and techinique. Im not complaining at all, i understand this is important. But lately i havent had much time to play the drums, so when i do play, i only play the rudiments my teacher wants me to learn. I feel like im not really getting any better, and if i only do what my teacher says, ill stay that way.

Bah...i really dont even understand this post myself, just a bit stressed out to be paying for lessons, and then not feel like im getting better. I mean sure, i might be able to play a paradiddle at 120bpm, but when playing with my band, it doesnt help, i feel like its a waste. Even though in the long run, i know its beneficial.

But i think the solution would just be to play music. I know that playing music on the guitar has helped me way more than learning scales and theory,not saying its better than learning theory, but its helped ME become a better guitar player.


*sigh* any tips or something?

scorpion990
10-28-2005, 11:10 PM
Have you only been playing for a month? Or taking lessons for a month? And he knows what he's doing. Just listen to him. You'll improve.

fatcow2000
10-28-2005, 11:12 PM
i was doing rudiments for a month or two straight, and then i started on the drums.

rudiments help a ****load.

nametaken
10-28-2005, 11:14 PM
Have you only been playing for a month? Or taking lessons for a month? And he knows what he's doing. Just listen to him. You'll improve.

Oh sorry about that, ive only played drums for a month too, i started lessons the week i got my set.

FockerTheLopper
10-28-2005, 11:27 PM
I just practice what I want to practice, I don't see drumming as something I need to get better as fast as I can. I understand its a long ride and I want to enjoy it. My method seems to be working because my progress for a year and half is pretty far. I know I'm not the best player but I know an awful lot and I'm pretty well rounded. All I need to rebuild is my doubles...
Edit: Woah can't believe I said that, I need to rebuild alot, but I set short term goals so rebuilding my doubles is on my agenda

Bone
10-29-2005, 12:21 AM
Ahh..

Drums take a LONG time. Years of dedicated practice. Can't say I'm sorry, cause that's just how things are.

Here's a hint though. Some people can practice for hours and some people can practice for 30 mins. Both people get about the same amount of learning done. Wich would you rather be?

Concentrated dedicated daily practice. You will sore only as high as your own limits.

darkevent89
10-29-2005, 01:19 AM
Well, i bet we all went through the same thing. What I did to stay motivated and not give up on lessons and on drumming was to watch other great drummers play. Watching Terry Bozzio videos, for me was a great encouragement. You should try it.

styler
10-29-2005, 01:53 AM
playing with music is a big thing you need to learn, but it all comes back to rudiments...just tell your teacher you need to learn how to feel your music so you can become more creative, also, if you dont think your getting any better, start raising the bpm, or memorize all 47 (not sure of th eexact number) rudiments, BB has, and hes like...top notch drummer

DxRocker
10-29-2005, 06:54 AM
When practicing, I mostly play to the metronome and try to do something I haven't done before yet and then work on making it sound good and speeding it up when I get comfy.

I should do more rudiments though, never really got into it. But I'm starting with a new teacher in December who's on tour through Russia at the moment. I've told him he needs to come over to my rehearsel room and he will get a throne and a snare drum and so shall I.

Snare works all the way. The only thing I'm willing to add is a bassdrum and hi-hat, but not to play grooves, only to stomp quarters alternating the bassdrum and the hats to keep time. He thought it was a lovely idea :thumb:

blujelly
10-29-2005, 07:04 AM
I do music alot, but also rudiments. I mainly use rudiments in my music or I just do music on its own.

FockerTheLopper
10-29-2005, 07:40 AM
I was just reading the posts and I would compare most the people here to Dave Weckl, with a need to get better by practicing hard, I would compare myself(and others who think the same way as me) to someone like Bernard Purdie, because its more about having fun and enjoying yourself and having others enjoy your playing even if it isn't complex(I'm not saying that Dave's music isn't enjoyable I love it, favorite song Dave Weckl and Buddy Rich big band- Time Check. If you notice hes always looking for ways to get better faster and he will become the best in like 5 years, anyone asks, whos the chop master, people will be like Weckl for sure because he is always growing evenly and he is already like the 10-15 best drummer(through the mind of most))

scorpion990
10-29-2005, 09:59 AM
I've been playing for a lot longer than you have, and I can only do paradiddles at 110 bpm. (I never actually worked at paradiddles, so I didn't expect to be able to do much better. I'm going to practice for an hour every night until I can work it up to 150 or so) I spent my time learning songs, and not sitting down with a metronome and doing quarter notes on a practice pad for 3 hours. I'm learning a bit of jazz right now, and its killing me. You need a good feel for triplets, and you need to do a lot of "Left left right" or "right right left". Since I didn't practice that, I get stuck very easily, and have to spend a few days practicing.

So, trust me, just work on your rudiments. I know I'm going to start doing it.

stevoibanez
10-29-2005, 10:17 AM
I've been playing for almost a year now, and jus tstarted rudiments 2 months ago. My practice plan is as follows:

40 minutes playing along to music
20 minutes rudiments
20 minutes playing along to music
40 minutes rudiments

darrell
10-29-2005, 10:32 AM
I'm not really a drummer (I get flamed everytime I mention it, but feel it's neccessary) and I was in my local music store and there was a poster of rudiments right above the electronic drumset (the only one you are allowed to play their, unless you work there) and I tried to figure them out. They are pretty tough. I tried a couple of the "easier" ones... I'm not exactly sure how they are supposed to sound though. Is it supposed to be all individual hits or are you supposed to let the stick bounce for double hits (Sorry I don't know all my terminology)... Very interesting stuff. I also thought snare work was one of the more impressive things. More impressive then watching someone do double bass at a million bpm (You know what I mean)...

But back to the original question... If that's what your teacher is showing you, I would stick with it. In time, you will learn what you need to become a good drummer.

Futuro
10-29-2005, 10:35 AM
Playing to music is fun. I do it for fun, you should do it for fun. Learn new songs for fun. After playing for a while you will see playing with songs can only take you so far.

But lately i havent had much time to play the drums, Practice pad. Invest in one (They are cheap) I spend more time working out on the practice pad in the middle of the night then I do playing the set the whole day. One thing I have learned is you must be situated porperly and take the practice pad seriously. Review stuff you know, try stuff you don't know. Than really challenge your self on something. Your hands will get more comfortable, and you will notice a difference in your playing on the set. ;)

I mean sure, i might be able to play a paradiddle at 120bpm, but when playing with my band, it doesnt help, i feel like its a waste. At first I thought this way as well.
It WILL help your playing. Not only will it give you some neat chops, but you are working the hell out of your brain. They will give you more control over the stick, show you different feels, etc.

Than once you get a solid feel down, and are more confident in your playing, you can start applying rudiments to the set easier. :)

ThugsRook
10-29-2005, 10:39 AM
Ive been taking lessons for about a month now. 90% of it has been rudiments and techinique. Im not complaining at all, i understand this is important. But lately i havent had much time to play the drums, so when i do play, i only play the rudiments my teacher wants me to learn. I feel like im not really getting any better, and if i only do what my teacher says, ill stay that way.

Bah...i really dont even understand this post myself, just a bit stressed out to be paying for lessons, and then not feel like im getting better. I mean sure, i might be able to play a paradiddle at 120bpm, but when playing with my band, it doesnt help, i feel like its a waste. Even though in the long run, i know its beneficial.

But i think the solution would just be to play music. I know that playing music on the guitar has helped me way more than learning scales and theory,not saying its better than learning theory, but its helped ME become a better guitar player.


*sigh* any tips or something?
rudiments are important, but they dont teach you how to play a song. practice with a band or to CDs.

:wave:

scorpion990
10-29-2005, 10:58 AM
Okay. I got my paradiddles up to 130 bmp, playing 16th notes. When you made this topic, it was 80 bmp. Funny how when you actually work at it, you improve quickly. I'm going to practice singles for a while. (I can do singles. I just want it to be more natural. A lot more natural)

gimp fest
10-29-2005, 11:15 AM
i mainly play songs :( in fact i don't really practice rudiments, i know i shold be i don't really understand them, all i really know is the parradidle.

/hasn't got a teacher

Finch88
10-29-2005, 12:04 PM
i started learning snare two years ago

i havent stopped using rudiments for practice ... theyre great for warming up and trying new techniques

scorpion990
10-29-2005, 12:05 PM
i mainly play songs :( in fact i don't really practice rudiments, i know i shold be i don't really understand them, all i really know is the parradidle.

/hasn't got a teacher


Just wondering. How fast can you play the paradiddle with a metronome? (a 16th notes)

Bone
10-29-2005, 12:14 PM
1/4 = 148 bpm... oh the other guy...

Rudiments are simply the most basic (or rudimental!!) rhythms a drummer will use.

If you play to a song, you are playing rudiments. As any groove or fill on a drumset is mandatorily the combination of 1 or more rudiments.

Caleb3221
10-29-2005, 12:51 PM
As I said in another thread, many educators and drummers keep their students on the pad for over a year before they move to set. You haven't been playing very long, so just keep at the rudiments and get them down. They will help you IMMENSLEY in the long run.

Oh, and to actually answer your question, I used to do a lot of rudiments. Now I do less, but I'm trying to force them back into my practice in a big way.

gimp fest
10-29-2005, 12:55 PM
Just wondering. How fast can you play the paradiddle with a metronome? (a 16th notes)

don't have a clue as i don't own a metronome. i'm so against the grain in these forums :cool:

Futuro
10-29-2005, 01:00 PM
http://www.metronomeonline.com/


don't have a clue as i don't own a metronome. i'm so against the grain in these forums I highly suggest getting a metronome, But, this will help for now.

gimp fest
10-29-2005, 01:08 PM
http://www.metronomeonline.com/

I highly suggest getting a metronome, But, this will help for now.

thanks :) . i need a ride cymbal before i purchase a metronome :p

Sithdrummer
10-29-2005, 07:51 PM
well if your getting bored or think you arent getting better, start practicing the Rudiments w/ your feet. or between your feet and hands.


that will get you going big time.

dj_ando
10-29-2005, 09:02 PM
if i practiced the way i should, i'd do more rudiments at the moment. my chops are really dragging now, but my practice isn't very disciplined and i always end up chucking on a record and jamming away. you should aim to have a balanced practice program, so you're working on everything. don't be like me :p

Jezen
10-29-2005, 09:40 PM
Just wondering. How fast can you play the paradiddle with a metronome? (a 16th notes)

My thumbs are sore and im tired, so i'm just sitting on 160 tonight.

Loyton
10-29-2005, 11:03 PM
My thumbs are sore and im tired, so i'm just sitting on 160 tonight.


My guitarist can rape me at paradiddles. We are both rudimental players, drumline guys. He just plays guitar instead of set and im the groovemaster! (not chop master mind you) Hes twice as good at guitar than he would be without drumming. But anyway, im about 160 right now (needless to say paradiddles are by far my worst rudiment, imbaressing because its the most common) What are you at singles.

Do not find the strange sight of more than one paragraph per post
INTIMIDATING

As far as threadstarter goes, allow me to talk a little bit about myself, not because im egotistical, but because i think it will help you.

I believe that drummers should not start out with the intention of being a "drumset player in a rock band" (though thats what we all think) but instead with the intention of being a percussionist and a musician first. What this intails is NOT running out and buying a set, rather running out buying these three essential things.

1. Practice Pad (20$)

2. Metronome (20$)

3. Matching sticks (15$)

Then go to vicfirth.com or get a personal teacher and learn the proper hand technique, rudiments, and drum basics. Learn these. At a later time, determined by age expertice and practice of these basic elements, you buy a drumset. Then learn the basic beats.

Well i guess thats not about me at all, eh?

I have been in school band playing percussion since 6th grade. Needless to say, i didnt give a flying fuck about it untill high school rolled around along with my musical ear. Then, in highschool, i worked my ass
off equally on rudiments and set playing. Groove CANNOT be taught it has to be aquired through practice and listening. So, i play hardcore rudimentally on my drumline for the first 1/3 of school then i go from that to jazz band. Then play metal on my own time. It works out for me, my chops arnt great and they arent bad, but i wouldnt trade my sence of "time" for anything INCLUDING monster chops. You have to balence so you are a well rounded player. When you start out, rudiments and technique are MORE essential than playing songs, due to you need a sturdy cornerstone to build the rest of your drumming skill on. Learn it wrong to start off with, you will eventually need to tear down that starting point and you will loose time.

Hope it helps, all my best.:thumb:

moogoogaipan
10-29-2005, 11:04 PM
But i think the solution would just be to play music. I know that playing music on the guitar has helped me way more than learning scales and theory,not saying its better than learning theory, but its helped ME become a better guitar player.


*sigh* any tips or something?

That's just the problem. I wish I had learned my scales back in the day. I've been a drummer for a long time, but when I got into 6th grade I played percussion, but I didn't take time to learn my scales at first. So when I got to high school I was way behind. I'm a very determined individual though and by senior year, I was top of the studio. Scales and theory are essential to improvisation....leading to Improvisation is essential to being a musician.

I'll put it to you this way, just cause you can say a sentence or two in Japanese, it does not mean that you are japanese.
Likewise, just cause you can make a cool riff or play a tune, that doesn't make you a musician. You have to be able to improvise...
The farther you go along with music the more that will become clear to you. I'm finally in the University setting and that is all that i'm hearing... Classical, Jazz, or whatever...improvisation is essential. Learn the basics and then move on...you can't expect to instantly be able to play music just because you've taken a few lessons, you have to build up a lexicon of patterns and feels.
You'll get it, but it takes time. I've been playing for over 7 years now and I'm so grateful that I spent many, many hours practicing rudiments.

Double Bass Jim
10-30-2005, 01:45 AM
Was never much into actually "practicing" with CD's. It's more important IMO to build a tool box, build style ect ect on your own. Work from books, watch DVD's you know the drill. And always play to a click :cool:

ThugsRook
10-30-2005, 06:07 AM
Was never much into actually "practicing" with CD's. It's more important IMO to build a tool box, build style ect ect on your own. Work from books, watch DVD's you know the drill. And always play to a click :cool:
i know what your saying Jim, but a n00b aint got a clue as to what you actually mean cause they have zero experience.

a toolbox can only be used if your working ;)
by that i mean a n00b aint gonna know with todo with a tool until theyve learned how to write their own drum parts. and to do that they need to play in a band or with CDs.

every chop in the world will be useless if the drummer isnt a musician yet.

:)

nametaken
10-30-2005, 08:36 PM
Sorry i havent been able to reply, working all day(literally).

But thanks, i think ill definately invest in a practice pad, sometimes the loudness of a snare keeps me from playing later on in the day. So i usually use a hard book. And i guess ill keep working those rudiments with no more fretting. My Dw 7002's come monday, so that will give me something else to work on. Hopefully ill soon get to the point where i can integrate the rudiments into the whole set well.

Killjoy
10-30-2005, 08:42 PM
dude no worries practacing rudiment really does help. just keep at it, soon or later it will come easy :D

KWG
10-30-2005, 08:56 PM
I find rudiments a good way to start the sesh becuase it warms you up. My teacher also starts the lesson this way. Every week or so he adds more rudiments to work on and then for the first 5 mins we work on it. Then the last 25mins we do groovs and songs that incorporate the rudiments.

Starship
10-30-2005, 09:48 PM
I make myself work with Stick Control on the practice pad every night for 30 minutes mandatory, sometimes I go for hours if I have nothing to do or I just feel like progressing. It really helps.

Bone
10-31-2005, 02:41 AM
Gotta love Stick Control. An amazing book.


I miss quoted myself above. That was 32nd note paradiddles at 1/4 = 148.