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m3cadet
10-19-2005, 10:19 PM
How do you use scales to solo?

zeppelin420
10-19-2005, 10:42 PM
you fool around with the notes in the scale, come up with licks and stuff.

xhaereticusx
10-19-2005, 11:51 PM
You choose a scale to play over whatever you're soloing on and you just play notes from the scale.

Karim
10-20-2005, 02:39 AM
And a killer scale to start with is the *enter drum roll* THE BLUES SCALE!

lol


-Karim

HoefNugz
10-20-2005, 07:15 AM
First scale i learned to improvise off was the Am pentanonic scale, very easy and check out www.cyberfret.com and click on improvisation on the left they have some very good free online lessons about it

jake plays guitar
10-20-2005, 01:03 PM
How do you use scales to solo?
how dont you use scales to solo?


but seriously just play with them hitting different notes. come up with some good licks and before you know it you'll be the improve mast

m3cadet
10-20-2005, 03:51 PM
so u can play the notes in a scale in any order?

7 skrang
10-20-2005, 03:53 PM
so u can play the notes in a scale in any order?
yes...

WindowLedge
10-20-2005, 06:23 PM
don't jump around to much unless you know how, though. you'll sound like a retard. play mostly conjunct (read: next to each other) notes and focus on sounding good (as opposed to playing really fast)

Brewer14
10-20-2005, 07:38 PM
Try to hear a melody in your head, then try and play it on guitar.

Also, don't try this at first, but you don't have to stay in the scale. As you move on, you'll find you can make much better licks by adding outside tensions (notes not in the scale.) Just be careful when using them, you don't want to use them TOO much, or end a lick on one.

xhaereticusx
10-20-2005, 08:03 PM
Try to hear a melody in your head, then try and play it on guitar.

Also, don't try this at first, but you don't have to stay in the scale. As you move on, you'll find you can make much better licks by adding outside tensions (notes not in the scale.) Just be careful when using them, you don't want to use them TOO much, or end a lick on one.
That's not correct.

Tensions are in the scale, the 2nd 4th and 6th are tensions. The 1357 are the chord tones.

jpshortstuff
10-21-2005, 06:17 AM
Chromatic notes are the notes not belonging to the scale i think

Ephemeral
10-21-2005, 12:00 PM
You use the notes from the scale to construct your own solo. It's actually pretty cool.

The LUE volta
10-22-2005, 02:08 AM
I find that arpeggios are much better for improvising as all of the notes have strong tonality and it is much easier to land on a strong chord tone when you change chords.

Brewer14
10-22-2005, 10:08 AM
That's not correct.

Tensions are in the scale, the 2nd 4th and 6th are tensions. The 1357 are the chord tones.

Right, those are inside tensions. Outside tensions are notes not in the scale.

Alive
10-22-2005, 01:05 PM
Right, those are inside tensions. Outside tensions are notes not in the scale.

Those are chromatic passing tones, or at least that's what they are called by convention.

Brewer14
10-22-2005, 01:15 PM
Those are chromatic passing tones, or at least that's what they are called by convention.

Alright. My teachers have always called them outside tensions, so that's what I do, but if they're the same thing it doesn't matter.

he11ixx
10-22-2005, 01:36 PM
anyone know a website or something where i can learn how to apply, say, a C-major scale all over the fretboard? you know, like, how to play a C scale starting on a different note?

Alive
10-22-2005, 06:34 PM
im drunk like y)our momma
WWW.MUSICTHEORY.NET DEELTE MUSICIANS FORUM

Thasaintamour
10-23-2005, 04:24 AM
Wow, so much confusion! Still one of the thread starter question by he11ixx wasn't answered (I don't think...)

He asks:

"anyone know a website or something where i can learn how to apply, say, a C-major scale all over the fretboard? you know, like, how to play a C scale starting on a different note?"

Answer:

Just make sure you understand the intervals involved in a major scale and repeat that starting on any note of the fretboard. Like this: starting on any note (the name of that 1st note would determine what major scale you're in) respect the "intervals" (separation between notes) and build your major scale from there. (Note: I'm talking on one string only, you can figure out your movements to the adjacent string below, going up in pitch, or above, going down in pitch, from the one you're in on your own) Okey, on the guitar, one fret to the immediate next equals one half step. Two frets or two half steps equals a full step. Any major scale is built like this. On the C major scale example: from C to D you have a full step (two frets distance). From D to E another full step. From E to F there's a half step (one fret distance). From F to G, a full step. From G to A, a full step. From A to B, a full step. And from B to C a half step. And that's it, you moved from C to C (one octave) respecting the intervals of a major scale. Notice how you only have a half step between the 3rd (E) and 4th (F) degrees and the 7th (B) and 8th (C, which is an octave higher). Now start on any note and do the same. The first note name is the scale you're in...Find a comfortable way to use the adjacent strings as I said before. Example: On the C scale, you might want to play C and D on the 5th string (open A) and the E of the scale, on the fourth string "open D" second fret, followed by F (3rd fret on "D" string) immediately next to E.. (half step) and on... etc...

Mind you that I don't know how much you know and/or don't know, so I'm making no assumptions.

Alive
10-23-2005, 04:17 PM
Wow, so much confusion! Still one of the thread starter question by he11ixx wasn't answered (I don't think...)

He asks:

"anyone know a website or something where i can learn how to apply, say, a C-major scale all over the fretboard? you know, like, how to play a C scale starting on a different note?"



There is a freewar program called ScaleTool which will show you the notes of a scale over the whole fretboard.

Trigger_003
10-23-2005, 04:27 PM
^ There's also http://www.cyberfret.com/scales/guitar-codex/index.php for a quick reference :).

Jimmy
10-23-2005, 06:14 PM
make sure you learn the pentatonic scale. God damn if that thing isn't useful.

coontc
10-25-2005, 04:47 AM
i know this really isnt the thread and im not answering a question but i need some help with a song im trying to learn, i need to know what scales are used in the solo of "why" by joe satriani. im cant find a decent tab of the real solo so im gunna try and do my own but im having trouble trying to figure out what scales are used so if someone could help, that would be good.

thanks