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SonorKen
04-02-2005, 10:44 PM
Ok, alot of people have asked how you build a home studio, this is an overview of materials and equipment and how to build one.

Ok, I built mine in my basement so 2 walls were already there and are completely underground, ya can't get any better soundproofing than that. I needed to build 2 soundproof walls and soundproof my ceiling. So, here we go.

First off, you need to figure out the dimensions of your walls and plan accordingly. I built my walls 8" thick. I framed up (2) 2X4's. You measure out your walls, run a chalk line across the floor and ceiling, and mark it. Now you lay your 2X4's on the floor and using a .22 cal. nail driver you nail the 2X4's to the concrete floor. You can rent the guns to do this, I bought the hammer driven ones as it was the same price as the rental (20 bucks) and thought I might use it in the future. Once the boards are attached you need to nail the ceiling 2X4's in. Once this is done now you stud up the first wall.

The trick here is to alternate your 2X4 framing studs. Put one on the outside of the wall, and the next on the inside of the wall. I put mine on 12" centers. If you want to put in any electrical outlets now is the time. Im not going to advise anyone on how to install this, if you want them, go buy a home improvement book and read about it. Repeat the same thing for the other wall. One of the walls is going to have to have a door in it. I suggest buying an outside door as they are usually solid and heavier. You'll need to frame this in as well. These doors are easy to frame in, measure the opening, leave that part open, and frame it in. Frame it in with (2) 2X4's on each side and above.

Once you have the walls done, the door put in, you will need to insulate the walls. Buy the heaviest insulation that you can get. I used R-34. The trick here is to WEAVE the insulation between the studs that you built offset. Wear a long sleeve shirt, wear a breathing mask, and gloves, this stuff will itch you to DEATH! Once you have the walls insulated it is time to drywall. You will need 2 different kinds of drywall, 1" thick regular drywall, and 1" thick sound proofing drywall. Lowes or Home Depot doesnt usually stock the soundproofing drywall, they had to order it for me. This stuff is REALLY expensive and REALLY heavy so have plenty of help when ya carry it.

Put up the regular drywall first, mud it all up and let it dry. Once its dry, sand it smooth, wipe it down with a damp cloth, let it dry again. Now put up the soundproofing drywall. Same thing, mud it, sand it, wipe it down. You will need to primer the drywall then paint it whatever color you want. When you drywall the ceiling I would suggest renting a drywall ceiling installer. I rented mine for 60 bucks a day, its worth it as you get a much better job and you don't wear yourself out. Spend plenty of time on all the corners, ceiling corners as well. The better these look, the better the room will look.

Once you have the walls painted its time to install the ceiling soundproofing. Buy some 1" thick sound re-inforcement insulation. This stuff is kinda like styrofoam but much more dense. Before you put this up you need to put some kinda cloth on it. Spray the SP foam (sound proofing insulation) with 3M 90 series spray glue. Give it about a minute and then put the cloth on it and press it down. I initially made mine smooth but later starting making elongated designs in it cus it looked cool. To put this up I used regular 2" coarse threaded dry wall screws directly into studs. You'll need to use a stud finder to find the studs.

Next is installing the flooring. I put a small area of linoleum in my studio for an office area. This is where I can work write drum tracks and work on stuff for the band. Linoleum is EASY to install. Put some linoleum glue down, trowel it out so its thin, then put the linoleum down and roll it with a linoleum roller. You may have to rent one of these as well (20 bucks or so). If ya want linoleum roll it for a few hours. If you want to install carpet you will need to rent a 7 piece carpet stretcher(25 bucks a day). When you buy carpet buy the best stuff you can afford. I bought some KILLER high density MoHawk carpet. Also, when picking out your carpet pad buy a commercial grade one that is really thick. You will have alot of heavy equipment on it so you will need something heavy duty.

Carpet is easy to install, it just takes time. Put your carpet tack strips down with the .22 cal. nail gun and liquid nails. Put the liquid nails on the tack strip, put it down about 1/4 of an inch from the wall, then nail it down. Give this a day to dry and set up. Now, buy a carpet knife, a regular utility knife will wear you out due to the angle and having to constantly change blades, you change blades enough with a carpet knife. Cut the carpet close to fit somewhere you can lay it out, bring it in and then put it down. Put it against your longest wall and tack it in with a hammer and tuck it with a carpet tool. Once this is done use the carpet stretcher to stretch it to the perfect fit, cut it, tack it then move on. Use the carpet stretcher about every 15" to make sure the carpet is stretched good.

Now is the time to put your trim in. Put your trim about 1/8th of an inch above the carpet and when you get to a corner cope it in. Do this all the way around the room. If you put trim on a concrete wall you will need to use Tapcon screws to attach it along with liquid nails. Next you put the toe molding trim in. My door is made of Ipswich pine so I stained my trim to match the door. Now that you have this in you need to put your 2nd door in. I bought a steel door, drilled 4 holes in it, and filled it up with blow in insulation. Frame this door inside the pre-hung door frame and hang it like you would an internal door. This ensures the door to be sound proof.

I ran a ventilation shaft directly off my main heating AC unit to give the room heat and AC. This is easy to do as well, I made mine out of some tin ducting material, a pair of tin snips, a vent, and some patience gets this done rather nicely. Since it is the first vent off your heat/ac unit it will put out a TON of air so your studio will be plenty cool and warm.

If you put your studio in a basement I would suggest investing in a good de-humidifier to keep touch with possible moisture in the basement. My basement is bone dry but I still have one.

Your pretty much done now, a few little things I did to customize my studio is I ran conduit all through the walls with openings at different places in the walls. I have all my XLR and 1/4" cables running through one and all my power cables running through another one. These come out where the drum station, guitar station, vox station, and bass station are. This keeps the floor from being covered in cables. I put stand up lights in my studio as overhead lights will rattle and make it a mess for recording.

Well, your pretty much done! If I have forgot something I'll post it up. If you need additional help feel free to let me know. Here are some pics!

http://www.stagefrightband.com/images/studio1.jpg

http://www.stagefrightband.com/images/studio2.jpg

http://www.stagefrightband.com/images/studio3.jpg

http://www.stagefrightband.com/images/studio4.jpg

http://www.stagefrightband.com/images/studio5.jpg

http://www.stagefrightband.com/images/studio6.jpg

http://www.stagefrightband.com/images/studio7.jpg


The kit in the pics is my Mapex kit I bought off Ebay for 75 bucks. This is how I plan to set up the 3005's when they come in next month.

zfmt
04-02-2005, 10:56 PM
great, good job. i think this might have been better in the lessons and artiles forum but good information

abandonthetruth
04-02-2005, 11:41 PM
Amazing sonorken .. and i love the room .. wish i had one like that.

LostInMusic464
04-02-2005, 11:54 PM
Great stuff man! You sure are one lucky dood.

CrazyDrummer4562
04-03-2005, 12:08 AM
wow I love the whiteboards, they would help a lot with my band.

SonorKen
04-03-2005, 12:18 AM
Yea, the dry erase boards are great for any band. You can buy actual 4X8 dry erase boards for 100 bucks or you can buy a sheet of 4X8 shower wall board for 9 bucks!

The Haunt Of
04-03-2005, 12:54 AM
its alright

undeclaredpunker
04-03-2005, 12:59 AM
you bought that kit for $75????!!!! oh and greta instructinal description there

Music rockS
04-03-2005, 01:36 AM
This man deserves somethign great. Great job Ken. Its nice to see you did it the proper way, it looks great. One day Id love to have a studio, but I need to find a use for it first :( .


NAD OH MY GOD YOU GOT THAT KIT FOR 75 DOLLARS I WISH I WAS YOU!!!!!!!!

RichHunt
04-03-2005, 05:06 AM
Nice stuff man.. I wish I had a jam place like that.. there's just no room in my house.

HEEEL
04-03-2005, 07:20 AM
Awesome, any chance you could give a rundown of all the individual pricings??

Chippy569
04-03-2005, 07:49 AM
hmmm, kinda messy :)


thanks for the guide ken, this will come in handy soon no doubt!

GabeSHL
04-03-2005, 11:58 AM
wow thats sweet.

jajara1
04-03-2005, 03:03 PM
hahaha cool white boards!

((HaZZaH))
04-03-2005, 03:07 PM
Cosy place you got there ken :) Loving your purple throne too :D

-Funky monk-
04-03-2005, 03:13 PM
That was great, i need to do that but i dont have the cash.

pearl.master.brx.punkster
04-03-2005, 03:22 PM
awesome ken i just saw your blueprint on the pearl forums and lol thats complicated man you area a pimp!

XvintagefadeX
04-03-2005, 03:29 PM
very nice, when i get a house i might look into that also

Voodoo
04-03-2005, 04:29 PM
Thats cool man, You're going to have to do something to clean up those concrete walls if you're going to be recording. Concrete is a killer when it comes to acoustics, but some acoustic foam or a similiar product will help knock out that problem if used correctly.

groomits
04-03-2005, 04:38 PM
can we ear some stuff you recorded in the studio?

SkaRabbit
04-03-2005, 05:52 PM
how did you get that kit for $75 i wish i could do that!

SkaRabbit
04-03-2005, 05:54 PM
my band just used a shed and insulated it and added a few layers and its now sound proof

-TheGlassPrison-
04-03-2005, 08:50 PM
great ken... really good explination!

SonorKen
04-03-2005, 09:25 PM
The concrete walls have posed no problem at all, the sound isnt bouncing around at all and the tentative recordings we have so far are pretty awesome.

I'll be posting up some audio soon. I am so excited and proud of what we have created so far, it is the most complex/technical stuff I have ever played. Some of it is odd-metered and some is straight forward.

I bought the kit off EBAY for 300 bucks. It came with a bunch of stands and cymbals that I didn't need. I sold all the extras on EBAY for 225 bucks, hence only having 75 in the kit!

groomits
04-03-2005, 09:26 PM
^^haha good job

zfmt
04-03-2005, 09:31 PM
i think this should be a sticky

SonorKen
04-03-2005, 09:45 PM
haha nah, it doesnt need to be stickied, not enough people will actually create thier own studios, and if they do they can search this out.

PowerStamp
04-04-2005, 12:48 AM
this is a great thread, I've been thinking about building a studio for quite awhile now, except from scratch which may take a little longer lol

See, my family just moved into a new house and the backyard is an acre that goes really far back. About half of it is completely empty, no trees or anything, so we were thinking about building a studio/stage out there (stage being a small extension facing the house if we ever decide to do a show there, the neighborhood approving that is lol)
This gave me a good idea of what I really need to do, thanks a lot

Stubbsy
04-04-2005, 03:40 AM
hey Ken, i am not getting it soundproofed (exactly) but plastered and insulated, wat would u do in this situation, get High Density insulation or normal insulation then like a layer of foam???wat would be the best idea for this??, i no i need to carpet the concrete floor and also remove the steel doors and all but wat other things shud i do to soundproof it as much as i can??

Det_Nosnip
04-04-2005, 03:46 AM
I've never bookmarked a thread before, this is a first. :)

((HaZZaH))
04-04-2005, 11:06 AM
I've never bookmarked a thread before, this is a first. :)

How do u Bookmark a thread ? :)

xeonman9000
04-04-2005, 01:08 PM
Ctrl + D, cool studio by the way, are you going to make it a fully equipt recording studio with desk, comfy sofas, vocal booth etc or just for rehersals?

((HaZZaH))
04-04-2005, 01:33 PM
^^

Thanks :thumb:

Win A Rabbit
04-04-2005, 10:11 PM
in december (long time away, but anyways) me and my dad are developing our basement in our new house, and he wants to build me a studio. since i have the whole basement for my room, a bathroom, a pool table, and a studio/practice space, whats the ideal size for a studio? including space for computer, etc.

SonorKen
04-04-2005, 10:15 PM
hey Ken, i am not getting it soundproofed (exactly) but plastered and insulated, wat would u do in this situation, get High Density insulation or normal insulation then like a layer of foam???wat would be the best idea for this??, i no i need to carpet the concrete floor and also remove the steel doors and all but wat other things shud i do to soundproof it as much as i can??
If you want to get by cheap then do the 8" wide wall with the alternating studs then weave the insulation through them. I used R-34 insulation for mine. It is really thick and heavy so it will do a good job. Do this then drywall, don't put up the soundproofing drywall. Put carpet down and then put up some 1" thick 4X8 sheets of foam insulation on the ceiling. Spray it with spray glue and put cloth on it, this will help with the ceiling really well.

This won't be sound proofed but it will be much quieter than not having it done. If your steel door is hollow drill some holes in it and fill it up with spray in insulation.

SonorKen
04-04-2005, 10:18 PM
in december (long time away, but anyways) me and my dad are developing our basement in our new house, and he wants to build me a studio. since i have the whole basement for my room, a bathroom, a pool table, and a studio/practice space, whats the ideal size for a studio? including space for computer, etc.
My room is 15X25 and is perfect. Don't build a perfectly square room, I like the rectangular rooms so the sound can travel down a long wall into a short wall. We are not getting any sound bouncing around at all. Quite possibly the most important parts are carpeting the floor and putting up cloth covered insulation on the ceiling.

SonorKen
04-04-2005, 10:25 PM
Ctrl + D, cool studio by the way, are you going to make it a fully equipt recording studio with desk, comfy sofas, vocal booth etc or just for rehersals?
Right now it is a rehearsal place. I have an area built onto the back long wall of the room that you can't see from in the pictures that can house an eventual control room. All I need to do is put in the glass window and another series of doors which shouldnt be that big of a job. Im not going to develop this part of the studio until I have all the equipment. I have a couch in the studio now, a desk, wireless internet connection, and a series of shelves built into one of the walls to hold all our cassette tapes. We record EVERY practice, label them, write them in a log book and store them on a shelf. If we want to remember or work on a riff we worked up a month ago we can look at the log book, then pull the tape.

Additionally I back all the tapes up digitally and store them on a computer in the studio. Once I move my big set of Sonors in there I'll be able to access this information with the laptop I use to run the electronics in the Sonor kit and pull up the digital recordings of our past practices and play them through our PA system.

I have several bands already lined up to use the studio to audition potential members for thier bands. I have actually been thinking about building a series of practice studios in a piece of property I own away from my house, putting a drum set, a bass rig, small PA, and guitar stack; schedule it out and rent time to other bands so they will have a nice clean place to practice. I was thinking about charging 25 bucks for 2 hours. If I decide to do this it will be later this summer.

Stubbsy
04-04-2005, 10:40 PM
hey thanks ken, ur a real genious. i am going to get as much soundproofed as i can but i dont really mind if it isnt as soundproof as urs, but its still gonna be awesome. i am also putting in a tv, couch, surround sound, just lots of beanbags and stuff which will take away alot of the sound aswell (i hope). Insulation will do alot, because its only got 1 wall and then theres outside bascially, like its a 4 walled building but its only 1 layer of something (either cement sheeting or plaster board) and yeah thanks for your tips. i will show my dad sumtime tonight and he will get an idea off of it!

SonorKen
04-04-2005, 11:16 PM
I have always found construction fun and it is relatively easy. I love geometry and math and building is all built around it. I still feel the most important things to key in on is the carpet and ceiling. If you can put the conduit in the walls, this really cleans the floor up. We were playing in there Sunday and all the XLR cables were run inside the walls and the floor was totally clean, no cables anywhere. This makes it SOOOO much nicer and it protects your cables as well. I believe all the conduit for the whole room (I did seperate conduits for power and audio cables) cost about 70 bucks. If you look at the pictures you can see a grey circular conduit sleeve sticking out of the bottom of the wall, these are the power conduits. The XLR conduits come out behind the cabs and behind my drums.

-TheGlassPrison-
04-06-2005, 03:52 PM
Bring it to the top.. cause this thread is wack yo

groomits
04-06-2005, 04:19 PM
That's cool, I got a room already isolated, with concrete and some styrofoam on. its really ugly, but very well isolated lol. The room is 20x30, and I plan to get a recorder this month. that will be a little start for my studio...

Voodoo
04-06-2005, 04:53 PM
It's a really good idea to avoid parallel walls.
Anyway - Soundproofing is largely a mass thing. You want lots of mass, such as two 5/8ths thick pieces of drywall on each side of the walls, with high density foam inside. Although, mineral wool or rock wool is a better alternative to standard fiberglass insulation, you might want to also consider a floating floor.

And for the acoustics of the room you might want to make sure you have a balanced sound. You can't just throw a bunch of acoustical foam on the walls and expect the low end to be under control. You're going to want to try to get a good sound at all frequencies if you are at all serious about what you are doing. (Again, look at making bass traps from Rock Wool.)

I've plugged these forums before, and I'd willingly do it again - http://johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php

I learned a lot from these forums; the guys on here are extremely knowledgeable and can help you out regardless of what part of the world you live in or what type of project you are working on. If you really want to soundproof your studio I'd look through what they have to say before you buy anything.

Really, not that what anybody does is wrong -- there just might be a smarter way to do things. If I were any of you kids saying you're going to have your dad help you soundproof your basement I'd read everything I could about soundproofing before I started. (You wouldn't want to buy material with no sound reduction capabilities and then have your dad lose his mind because he just wasted all that money.)

xeonman9000
04-06-2005, 05:37 PM
Jesus christ Ken, I thought you were a paramedic or something, If a civil servant can afford that kind of thing then my career path is pretty much chosen.

puppet.master
04-06-2005, 06:18 PM
what kind of sticks are those theyre all blue

otrdrummer
04-06-2005, 08:12 PM
Is that a mapex v series you got there for your drums. Cus it looks like it and thats what i got right now and i was wondering if that is did u cut that hole yourself because my drum head didnt have one

SonorKen
04-07-2005, 11:58 AM
You can make quite a bit of money as a medic if you don't care to work alot. Being a medic is a great job if you want to play music, you only work 10 days a month.

The blue drum sticks are actually Vater sticks wrapped with Stick Rapp (Pro-mark). I play for VERY long periods of time all at once and this stuff makes the sticks more comfortable.

I think the Mapex's are V-series. The hole was already cut in the reso head when I bought them, it looks like they cut it with box cutter as its not perfectly round.

As far as Voodoo's post. If your saying the techniques I used to build my room are not correct I disagree with you. I used a VERY specific drywall MADE for professional studios. The stuff was about 75 bucks for a 4X8 sheet. I consulted 2 different construction companies that have built professional studios and ran my ideas by them and they both said it would work out perfect. They agreed with the dimenstions of the room as well.

As far as stuff glued to walls to kill sound I have never had much experience with it, if your going to do that I think you are better to hang blankets off of wire placed at strategic places. The people I have talked to about the glue up stuff say that is does help but only in places that a professional studio would be able to notice. For my purposes I didn't feel I needed that. I may add in the foam corner pieces tho.

Voodoo
04-07-2005, 12:25 PM
What I'm saying is that if most people just ran to Home Depot and bought general construction supplies they would be unhappy with the results. Soundproofing isn't cheap, although it is possible to achieve excellencent results by using modestly priced materials. You just have to do things correctly.

As far as what I said about foam or rock wool on the walls, it's just a sound control issue. As everybody knows, Concrete is not exactly great for making a studio out of. Some acoustical treatment would help to deaden or control the room's sound as needed. I'm no professional but I can hear the difference between a room that has balanced sound from just any ole' room. I know that it's hard to get good sounding drums without a good room to record in.

And Ken, could you post some of the specs of this drywall you used, who makes it, and if it is available nation-wide. I'm just interested to see what $2.40 sqft can do, as that seems extremely steep in cost.

SonorKen
04-07-2005, 01:03 PM
They drywall I used is Solitude STC 54-77 QuietRock QR-540. I ordered it through Lowes. The research I did valued it, including labor at 5.89 per sqft. But, I did the labor myself. This stuff is designed so you don't need to stagger studs but I staggered them anyway and went with the dense insulation to kill all the sound.

Nicko_Shmicko
06-06-2005, 03:16 AM
I have a room just like yours that is soundproof, but im gunna paint it, mind if i use your colour shceme?

Harrow
06-06-2005, 03:28 AM
Wouldn't it be best to cover the walls and the ceiling with carpet as well? Rough edges will make sound bounce no matter what, but I'm sure its not 100% necessary. If you really wana go all out you can get this professional grade material, its kind of like black foam eggcrates. I think the stuff costs like 35 bucks for a 8'x10' section.

DxRocker
06-06-2005, 03:41 AM
I have a room just like yours that is soundproof, but im gunna paint it, mind if i use your colour shceme?

Do you really think he cares if you use his color scheme? And was that question worth quoting the whole enormous post??

To give this post some meaning:

ken, what's the equipment you are looking into to use in the studio? (mixing desk, mics, software,...)

I have a Behringer sl-2442fx (16 channel + 4 stereor's, 24 total). I'm gonna get a 16 in/out audio interface from our bassist for the pc. After that, I'm just gonna need some mics and I will be set...

xeonman9000
06-06-2005, 04:13 AM
I'm quite new to this, but how would you send that many individual tracks from the mixer which only has a stereo main output to the audio interface? I checked out some audio interfaces and it seems that they has many mono jacks inputs at the rear so presumably you would require a seperate output for each one on the desk?

DxRocker
06-06-2005, 05:10 AM
I'm quite new to this, but how would you send that many individual tracks from the mixer which only has a stereo main output to the audio interface? I checked out some audio interfaces and it seems that they has many mono jacks inputs at the rear so presumably you would require a seperate output for each one on the desk?

Lol :)

Yeah, each input has an output also...
You have a lot of options with that. You can even choose wich channels are to be cut of from the main out etc.

So in my case, I will hook up all the instruments and the vocals to the mixer and lead them all to the interface to go into the pc. Since the mixer is also the pa for the vocal installation, I need to cut the instruments off from the main output, since I don't want to have guitars and drums coming out of the monitors, only vocals. So in short: everything (every channel) goes into the pc, but only 2-3 channels for the vocals also go through the main out.

On most mixers you also have sub groups. Another possibility is also to lead the 2-3 vocal channel to a separate group and have that group go through the monitors. You have lots of choices basicly... :thumb:

xeonman9000
06-06-2005, 05:37 AM
Lol :)

Yeah, each input has an output also...

Ahhh, is that the "INSERT I/O" below the line-in? I didn't realise that was what it was for, how do you dictate whether it's an input or an output?
I have a UB1204-pro and I just pan two channels hard left and hard right then send them to the stereo input on my soundcard, I was thinking, I might also be able to use the 3/4 submix to send another two channels to the digital in, or can you not use jack to spdif cables :confused: ?

DxRocker
06-06-2005, 05:41 AM
Ahhh, is that the "INSERT I/O" below the line-in?

yep :)

it is an output when you plug the cable only half way in.
wouldn't know about that spdif stuff though. My table is completely analog

Nicko_Shmicko
06-14-2005, 12:21 AM
Do you really think he cares if you use his color scheme? And was that question worth quoting the whole enormous post??

To give this post some meaning:

ken, what's the equipment you are looking into to use in the studio? (mixing desk, mics, software,...)

I have a Behringer sl-2442fx (16 channel + 4 stereor's, 24 total). I'm gonna get a 16 in/out audio interface from our bassist for the pc. After that, I'm just gonna need some mics and I will be set...

sorry dude. I'll go edit the post now, i was tired, not sure why i did it in the first place.

fiojamdrummer
06-30-2005, 02:43 PM
Hi Ken,

Sorry for dragging up an old thread but Iíve got a few questions for you. I want to soundproof my garageÖ Iíve read your very thorough explanation of how to do this but Iím still a bit confused about a few things.
I really donít know anything about DIY so I apologise in advance!

I thought I could split the garage in half and build a room within the garage at the far end. This would mean using the 3 walls of the garage and then constructing a dividing wall to split the garage in two. The dividing wall would have a door.

So, the plan is to put up a frame a certain distance into the room from the proper, brick wall. When you say you use insulation (R-34), what is this? Is it proper soundproofing stuff or just standard insulator? Iíve seen something called Acoustic Mineral Wool which seems pretty priceyÖ would this be the same stuff youíre talking about?

What is drywall? Is this American (Iím UK). Iíve seen Plasterboard being suggested many times so is this the English version of drywall?

What do you mean by Ďmud it upí? Whatís the mud?

Any more tips (I really have no clue!! But donít worryÖ it wouldnít be me doing the work but I need to understand it so I can think about price and how much is involved.

I obviously want to cut out as much noise as possible for the neighbours sake but Iím not sure if Iíd need to TOTALLY soundproof the garage (Iím not sure how effective it is). I want to do this as cheaply as possible but I am aware that it will cost a fair but (I currently rent a very small farmhouse for my drums and it costs £200 per monthÖ if I can play my drums in my garage, the money will hopefully be recouped as I wont be paying out that rent any longer)

Many thanks!! :)

sam'drummerboi'ellis
12-31-2005, 03:17 AM
Could you build an outer wall of brick and leave about a one foot gap and then build and inner wall of brick. And inbetween the two walls put insublation? Then pad the inner wall with carpet etc...? Just wondering if that would work at all

Talos
12-31-2005, 04:08 AM
I am converting my garage into a room. I will be sleeping in thir and it will be for jamming out and maybe recording. Ill check out the dimensions but would i use the same process?

440561
01-06-2006, 11:45 AM
I wonder when he will reply...

440561
02-01-2006, 12:54 PM
Where are you sonorken? I wanna hear these replies...