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bogus1017
11-12-2004, 09:44 AM
I want to write some songs for the electric guitar. ive been playing for like a year and i know some scales: 6th root penatonic minors. 5th root penatonic minors, and 6th root penatonic majors(is that what its called? lol). anyways i know the basic and i can play solos and stuff from other bands, but when im jammin and playing the lead in some scales while listnin to music, i cant be creative. I need some tips on being creative. I want to write songs, but i need to be more creative. any tips?

luciferchrist
11-12-2004, 10:08 AM
I want to write some songs for the electric guitar. ive been playing for like a year and i know some scales: 6th root penatonic minors. 5th root penatonic minors, and 6th root penatonic majors(is that what its called? lol). anyways i know the basic and i can play solos and stuff from other bands, but when im jammin and playing the lead in some scales while listnin to music, i cant be creative. I need some tips on being creative. I want to write songs, but i need to be more creative. any tips?


I write everything with my acoustic or piano.

I usually get a general idea of a progression, loop a drum, bass, piano, acoustic guitar or whatever I am feeling and then I just jam over it with my electric to come up with melodies.

hind brain
11-12-2004, 10:14 AM
I was reading an article this shredder wrote, and he also felt like he was lacking in creativity. But he found out that wasn't the problem, and it was that his ear wasn't too spiffy. He had trouble getting the music in his head to come out of his guitar.

I could link you to the article if you want. He had some suggestions as to how to develop your ear so you can better express yourself.

Just an idea, is all.

Also, make sure you have expansive interests in different kinds of music. Like hell. I find that when I write for guitar a lot of my ideas and techniques I use come from the style of music I'm currently interested in.

I highly suggest making sure you're listening to a lot of different good stuff.

morrissey
11-12-2004, 02:11 PM
I'm not sure if this would work for you, but this sort of thing works well enough:

a. Find a chord pattern you like. Start simple, (ex: E-E-A-E-B blues sort of thing, or G-Em-C-D... something easy). Record yourself playing this for say 3 minutes (or get a friend to play along with you). And then just play. Work within scales you know, just play random notes, try chord inversion... anything. This way you will know what sounds BAD with these chords, but you may stumble across a lick or riff or something that sounds good.

b. This takes alot of experimenting... you may come up with something amazing the second you pick up the guitar; you may also never write something that sounds suitable to you. But really, it is trial and error. If you do find something good, structure your song around this. If you already have lyrics, sing along, if you don't just sing random words until you find something you like.

c. I find the best way to write music is to jam along with a band. That way, though you may not come up with an amazing guitar riff, your drummer might have an interesting beat that inspires you to write something...

These are just some ideas, some may never work, hopeful one will be at least a bit helpful :)

kh203
11-12-2004, 03:04 PM
I was reading an article this shredder wrote, and he also felt like he was lacking in creativity. But he found out that wasn't the problem, and it was that his ear wasn't too spiffy. He had trouble getting the music in his head to come out of his guitar.

I could link you to the article if you want. He had some suggestions as to how to develop your ear so you can better express yourself.

Just an idea, is all.

Also, make sure you have expansive interests in different kinds of music. Like hell. I find that when I write for guitar a lot of my ideas and techniques I use come from the style of music I'm currently interested in.

I highly suggest making sure you're listening to a lot of different good stuff.

I don't know about the other guys, but I'd like a link to the article because I'm experiencign the same problems. I've got the basics down, but I just cant get the stuff in my head down onto paper or however you want to put it.

theslideparamita
11-12-2004, 04:35 PM
Part of my practice routine is to just go for a walk every day, and just get a chord progression going in my head and think of ideas in my head that sound cool over it. This will develop your ear a lot. This is also helpful because I am a jazz guitarist a lot of the time and I play in rock jam-band (kind of a mix of the allmans and the dead) so it really helps me get all these spontaneous ideas in my head when I jam with people.

Also, I practice jazz with Jamey Aebersold play along cds, so I can practice soloing myself with a backing track. I highly reccomend this or whatever the rock equivalent is to these cds. I also jam along with songs on the radio, mostly soloing and write riffs every day.

I'm not a shredder and although I do practice scales and arpeggios, I'm not a fast guitar player by any means, but I can make my guitar sound cool anyway. Listen to all styles of music, you will benefit from it, especially jazz even if you hate it at first, you will enjoy it later on.

Another thing to try is to work on rhythmic syncopation in solos, by practicing your scales/sequences with different rhythms. I also recommend getting The Band's dvd The Last Waltz, where Robbie Robertson creates very interesting solos with only the same notes you use in the scales you know at the same speed you do my knowing exactly which beats to play on. Not only did I enjoy this, but I also learned a lot about guitar from it. They play with everyone from Clapton to Neil Young, and Robertson makes Clapton look bad at guitar because he's just so much more interesting as a guitar player.

Learn all your modes, and be able to go between them fluently and make the chord changes flow. When you know your modes and scales, (not just pentatonic) you will find that there are many more harmonic/melodic things you can play than before.

From doing all this, or even some of it, you will find that it may not me a difference right away, but when playing with other people, you will get all these amazing fresh-sounding spontaneous ideas often with other influences put into your style of music and you will be a much better guitar player just by listening to things better.

bogus1017
11-13-2004, 10:42 AM
hey thanks guys. this did help. im also gonna ask my teacher if music theory would help a lil more.

hind brain
11-13-2004, 10:47 AM
I don't know about the other guys, but I'd like a link to the article because I'm experiencign the same problems. I've got the basics down, but I just cant get the stuff in my head down onto paper or however you want to put it.

No problem.

http://www.cyberfret.com/ear-training/developing-your-ear/index.php