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London Elektricity’s latest album Yikes! received pretty decent feedback upon release. But the music world moves fast, and Drum and Bass fans will now be gearing up for the Yikes! remix album, due later in July. With big names from the Hospital Records label like B-Complex, Danny Byrd and Logistics making an appearance, hopefully there’ll be something as stunning as Apex’s remix of Just One Second, High Contrast’s version of Remember, or his own acoustic version of Elektricity Will Keep Me Warm with Elsa Esmeralda.

A remix by the very promising Med School recruit Lung certainly offers one reason why the album is likely a must have for fans of Drum and Bass. The remix even receiving the praise of the Colminator himself via his twitter feed. For those wanting more previews, check out the album’s page on the Hospital Record’s website.


“I cannot walk through the suburbs in the solitude of the night without thinking that the night pleases us because it suppresses idle details, just as our memory does.”
Jorge Luis Borges

Memory is nothing if not a collision of creation and fact: the perpetual struggle between actuality and imagination. There is always something tangible and factual at the heart of each memory, but the contextual world is one of modality. Ever changing: the colour of that car, what that person was wearing, minute details that ebb and flow. These things are all subject to change over time because they are overcome by imagination. When my Grandmother was in the hospital, for example, she remembered meeting my brother’s fiancé on a bus a few years prior—but to her that bus ride was from Clyde Bank to Glasgow and not the city bus in London (where the meeting actually took place). These details are an extension of imagination and how it corrupts memory. In many ways this is how nostalgia works. Avoiding a purely clinical, Freudian framework, nostalgia is the erosion of actuality in favour of compartmentalized emotions. Over time we elude precision of memories in favour of a broader spectrum of general feelings that umbrella over periods of our lives.

Music plays an important role as an agent of nostalgia; platitudes such as “the soundtrack of our lives” are not entirely without merit. As we compartmentalize our more nostalgic memories, so does it seem that we compartmentalize the music…


The greatest put-down… of all time.

via @owenpallett


A few years ago, long time Fates Warning fans went crazy when they found out that Jim Matheos and ex-vocalist John Arch were teaming up for some new music. The end result was the underwhelming A Twist of Fate. Don’t get me wrong, the songs were awesome but there were only two of them. Listening to that album was like watching the gif where the hot girl is opening her shirt but just before it gets to the good stuff the gif starts over. Basically, A Twist of Fate was good enough to be mildly satisfying, but it was mostly just frustrating because it wasn’t enough. That is where Sympathetic Resonance comes in. Not only is it an actual full album by the John Arch/Jim Matheos duo, but it also features the return of longtime Fates Warning guitarist Frank Aresti — rounded out by Joey Vera (Armored Saint, Anthrax) on bass and Bobby Jarzombek (Halford, Sebastian Bach) on drums. It’s like someone found the full version of that teasing little gif and it turns out that her mom and sister are in it too… it just doesn’t get much better ;)

The first song released from Sympathetic Resonance is titled “Stained Glass Sky”, and it is actually just a five minute snippet of the entire fourteen-minute track. Regardless, the song is more than enough to prove to longtime fans that the…


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What happens when reggae and ska meet jazz and afrobeat?

This, apparently.

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From GagaDilo’s “Skafrobalkanik Jazz Project”


Perhaps what best sums up Eprhyme’s two passions are his synagogue performances. Signed to Calvin Johnson’s insanely DIY K Records, Eprhyme attempts to blend firm Jewish faith with a love for the traditions of hip-hop, and his strong affinity with the depth of Jewish stories finds an unusual home on his newest record, genuinely titled Dopestylevsky. It plays with both components: it is, at times, perhaps too good at honouring its musical influence (“Let’s Build” shows itself up with its whacky, somewhat cartoonish chorus), but its strongly conscientious focus fits snugly into the unusual backdrop: the lyrics on Dopestylevsky range from issues of religious identity to the strong environmentalism found here, but it never quite feels like a lecture buried in gimmick. Instead, Eprhyme’s music is created interestingly enough- and with two palettes from which he clearly draws inspiration- that his record works both as slightly over-indulgent hip-hop and a good natured show of faith.

“Let’s Build” Eprhyme (ft. Compost, Smoke of Oldomion) by Daksi Entertainment


Here’s a list of major new releases for the week of July 12, 2011. Please feel free to request reviews for any of the following albums from staff or contributors.

Accessory – Underbeat (Metropolis Records)
Alkaline Trio – Damnesia (Epitaph)
Miles Bonny – Lumberjack Soul (Melting Pot Music)
Breathe Carolina – Hell Is What You Make It (Fearless Records)
Colbie Caillat – All Of You (Universal)
Cali Swag District – The Kickback (RED GENERAL CATALOG)
Cannabis Corpse – Beneath Grow Lights Thou Shall Rise (Tank Crimes)
Kasey Chambers – Little Birds (Sugarhill)
The Cool Kids – When Fish Ride Bicycles (Green Label)
Dance Or Die – Nostrodamnation (Metropolis Records)
Decapitated – Carnival Is Forever (Nuclear Blast)
Earth Crisis – Neutralize The Threat (Century Media)
Fair to Midland – Arrows & Anchors (Entertainment One Music) – John A. Hanson
Eleanor Friedberger – Last Summer (Merge Records) – Rudy Klapper
Get Scared – Best Kind of Mess (Motown)
Darren Hanlon – I Will Love You At All (Yep Roc Records) – Dave Donnelly
The Horrors – Skying {UK} (XL Recordings)
Iced Earth – Festivals Of The Wicked [CD/DVD] (Century Media)
Imperative Reaction – Surface (Metropolis Records)
Incubus – If Not Now, When? (Epic) – Nick Butler
Chris Isaak – Best of… (Mailboat Records)
Nikki Jean – Pennies in a Jar (S-Curve Records)
Juno Reactor – Inside The Reactor (Metropolis Records)
Kalup And Franco…


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Kristian Matsson, The Tallest Man on Earth, released a new single on Friday through the Adult Swim singles series entitled “Weather of a Killing Kind”. It’s what you might expect from Matsson – a wistful folk song that beautifully weaves it way from start to finish with sweeping vocal melodies and gentle, finger-plucked accompaniment. Matsson has a style, and he’s not ready to let go of it just yet.

But the song is also something new for Matsson; it’s topical. “Weather of a Killing Kind” makes no particular dedication, but you have to believe that Matsson had at least one of the recent natural disasters on his mind when he penned the song. The earthquake in Japan, the Las Conchas wildfire in Santa Fe, or the floods in Pakistan, perhaps. What came to mind for me, perhaps because it hits closer to home, was the tornado in Joplin, MO; today, authorities announced the 159th confirmed death to come of the disaster. “I see the clouds, I see the shadows/It’s rainin’ wolves outside our door/We stand and watch through hesitation/’Cause they’ll be spread out there forevermore,” Matsson sings in the first verse, announcing the impending doom.

But it wouldn’t be a TMoE song without everything turning despairingly personal: “And I feed the clouds, they are my shadow/’Cause I have raised the cubs myself alone.” In the final chorus, the lyrics are transformed: “Here is my weather of a killing kind.” The song is full of beautiful poetic twists and turns, and while…


When Pat Grossi, the man behind Active Child, dropped Curtis Lane into circulation in mid-2010 it marked something determinedly different from the rest of the pack still hung-up on replicating the chillwave sound artists like Washed Out and Toro y Moi were perfecting. Even though he’d been lumped by association into the genre, Grossi’s gorgeous falsetto and sun-stroked harp melodies were much more direct and in many ways much more beautiful than anything his peers were doing and were strung closer to dream pop than anything else.

Now with his debut LP, You Are All I See, ready to go, Grossi has released a track off the album as part of the Adult Swim Singles Program and it’s absolutely beautiful; one of those songs that’s sure to get the hype steamroller into motion, sounding like the r&b vocal sensibilities of How To Dress Well layered over much brighter, more operatic melodies than anything Love Remains could conjure. Listen to “Hanging On” here:

Active Child – Hanging On by snipelondon


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For today’s track of the day I was going to choose a track off Stephen Marley’s new album, Revelation Part 1: Root Of Life, but instead I’ve opted to go with this, a song from Ellwood’s recently released Lost In Transition. Here’s why: not only should you already know how good Stephen Marley is, but I just couldn’t choose a single song off such a strong album. So, then, Ellwood.

Ellwood is a new project from Mad Caddies singer Chuck Robertson and before you ask, no, they don’t sound like Mad Caddies. I hated the Mad Caddies but love this album. I love it because of its simplicity: this is traditional, summer-time pop-infused ska. No horns, no gimmicks, just laid back reggae tinged sun soaked riddims. And if you cringed reading that, good, because I cringed writing it, but if even a small part of you cracked a grin, be it out of pity or nostalgia, Ellwood’s worth checking out. For fans of Sublime, the Slackers, etc, etc.

Check out “Sunshine Garden” below.

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“I not only offer great sex but best spots in parking lots / I’m handy and got swag so you know this ‘tard is hot.”

Look, argue all you want but you can’t argue with facts. Vagina ain’t handicapped.


Today was a proud, proud day in the world of journalism for so many reasons, but the one posterity will remember is the closure of Britain’s News of the World Sunday newspaper after 168 years of proud dedication to the art of photographing tits and drunk celebrities outside London nightclubs.

All 200+ staff at the London office have been laid off (those in the Dublin office technically they’ve been given 90 days “gardening leave”) and the NotW will be replaced by a Sunday edition of the equally upstanding Sun newspaper. Presumably some of the staff will be redeployed, but certainly not all, and many fine journalists will find themselves out of work while former editor Rebekah Brooks keeps her post at News International.

People say it’s difficult to have much sympathy for News of the World journalists, and to a point it’s true, but beneath the sickening phone-hacking scandal and the brain-deadening “social diaries” there was an excellent team of sports journalists, sub-editors and administrative staff who face an uncertain future while their sleazy overlords scramble to preserve their own reptilian skins. Still, nobody likes a tabloid hack and, for that alone, we give to you The Wildhearts and ‘News of the World’ from their epic 1994 album Earth vs. the Wildhearts.


Mastodon are back and are warping your childhood. The video for said track (to which Adult Swim have disabled embedding) can be seen here.


If you thought we were going to stop posting this just because Osama is dead (so is Obama, according to Fox), you’ve clearly misread the situation horribly.

Enjoy your independence everybody, no matter what country you live in, and don’t forget to thank Will Smith for killing the aliens and making all this possible.


40 years gone, the legend of Jim Morrison has long since superseded the man himself to the point where clueless music journalists feel free to refer to his death as his “breaking on through to the other side,” a lyrical nod to the Doors’ 1967 classic single.

Such dimwitted tributes are, sadly, common currency. The image of the rebellious rocker valiantly passing over to the “other side” is a far more romantic notion than what occurred in reality (or at least in probability, as no autopsy was ever performed): Morrison and his junkie girlfriend took a suicidal cocktail of drugs overnight, leading the singer to vomit up his internal organs before slowly, and painfully, meeting his end in a Parisian bathtub.

The romantic image of Morrison is made even cuter due to the fact that he, by all accounts, was a misogynistic dog who’d fuck anything that walked on two legs, or maybe even three. Yet that’s what made him such a compelling figure: as a man, he was stirringly, disarmingly handsome and as a songwriter he was deceptively accomplished. He was the rock n’ roll ideal: irresistible and prodigiously talented.

While the abiding sonic image of the Doors as a group might be their longer, more psyched-up pieces, ‘Light my Fire’ was Robby Krieger’s baby and was driven by Ray Manzarek’s iconic keyboard melody. What Morrison brought to the party was a manic, almost primal energy, best exemplified by that distinctive guttural roar – he was in many…


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