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Rory

Every band tries to win you over with how “original” they are and how their sound “cannot be classified by genre labels.” HOWEVER, everything about the band Rory is original. From the absurd sense of humor that occupies more of the 5 members’ time than should legally be allowed, to the non-sequitur writing and arrangements included in each of their captivatingly fun musical compositions, Rory doesn’t just preach their originality, nor do they simply practice it. Rory lives their originality.

With lineage of the band that can be traced back to 1998, it is no wonder ...read more

Every band tries to win you over with how “original” they are and how their sound “cannot be classified by genre labels.” HOWEVER, everything about the band Rory is original. From the absurd sense of humor that occupies more of the 5 members’ time than should legally be allowed, to the non-sequitur writing and arrangements included in each of their captivatingly fun musical compositions, Rory doesn’t just preach their originality, nor do they simply practice it. Rory lives their originality.

With lineage of the band that can be traced back to 1998, it is no wonder that the members feel as if each of their respective identities is somewhat less without surrounded by the others. Consequently, the musicians’ on-stage skin is obviously more comfortable than when their performances come to a close.

Chris, Jeremy, Joel, Marcs, and Jordan, as they read left-to-right on stage, put on an epic of a live show. Jeremy Menard’s tall frame soaks up the center spotlight as he sways cool and calm allowing his vocal chords to do the dancing. Contrastingly, Joel Setzer fills the back of the stage with flailing arms and flashes of cymbal with astonishing poise. Marcs Ispass and Jordan Shroyer share stage left, putting each other at equal risk of great bodily harm and putting audience members at certain risk of an overwhelmingly entertaining show. They might as well be competing in a competitive dance-off for the duration of the performance. Chris Moore shares his stage time between standing his ground firmly behind his microphone and effects pedals and roaming the stage like a caged jaguar. The five members – musicians – entertainers – RORIES… provide a sight to be seen, for certain.

Early in 2006, Rory took a break from coast-to-coast, border-to-boarder touring to spend four weeks outside of Los Angeles recording their debut full-length record, We’re Up to No Good, We’re Up to No Good with John Avila (former bassist of Oingo Boingo) and Mark Hoppus (bassist/singer of Plus 44 and the recently defunct Blink 182) producing select tracks respectively. The record is a long-overdue follow-up to their 5-song EP Always Right as in We Are which was released back in June of 2004. Both records have been released through 111 Records, a part of Warner Music Group’s East West group.

The record, though only recently released, has received rave reviews from buzz-inflicting AbsolutePunk.net, Alternative Press, and AMP magazines, as well as plenty of other websites. The songs on the record are as well composed as they are played as they are fun. Fun is the basis of the music and all that surrounds it for Rory. The best part of these songs is the guarantee that to a first-time listener, that they will DEFINITELY, no matter what their musical taste, hear something they like in Rory.

From the records to the shows to the members involved. Two things are clear. Rory will continue to emerge a standout artist amongst all; and Rory will have their fun – their way, taking the listener along with them.

-Rory. « hide


We're Up To No Good, We're Up To No Good
2006

4
3 Votes

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