RELATED MUSIC LISTS
 Jazz Albums I Dig
 Eastern Bloc Roc
 100 Jazz Albums You Need
 Albums Worth Checkin' [2]
 (1955-2014) Favourite Albums Of
 Hearing Therapy
 Junior
 Go Habs
 My Vinyl Collection Thus Far
 Jazz Albums I Dig
 Favourite Guitar Solo?
 Eastern Bloc Roc
 Megalodon Is Real
 Songs Of The Summer
 My Favorite Guitar solos
 I Hate Recording
 100 Jazz Albums You Need
 Fo The Shreddaz
 The Most Influential Musical Genius
 Jazz Guitarists You Must Listen To

» Edit Band Information
» Edit Albums

» Add a Review
» Add an Album
» Add News

Django Reinhardt

Django Reinhardt was the first hugely influential jazz figure to emerge from Europe -- and he remains the most influentialEuropean to this day, with possible competition from Joe Zawinul, George Shearing, John McLaughlin, his old cohort StephaneGrappelli and a bare handful of others. A free-spirited gypsy, Reinhardt wasn't the most reliable person in the world,frequently wandering off into the countryside on a whim. Yet Reinhardt came up with a unique way of propelling the humbleacoustic guitar into the front line of a jazz combo in the days before amplification became widespread. He would ...read more

Django Reinhardt was the first hugely influential jazz figure to emerge from Europe -- and he remains the most influentialEuropean to this day, with possible competition from Joe Zawinul, George Shearing, John McLaughlin, his old cohort StephaneGrappelli and a bare handful of others. A free-spirited gypsy, Reinhardt wasn't the most reliable person in the world,frequently wandering off into the countryside on a whim. Yet Reinhardt came up with a unique way of propelling the humbleacoustic guitar into the front line of a jazz combo in the days before amplification became widespread. He would spin joyous,arcing, marvelously inflected solos above the thrumming base of two rhythm guitars and a bass, with Grappelli's elegantlygliding violin serving as the perfect foil. His harmonic concepts were startling for their time -- making a direct impression uponCharlie Christian and Les Paul, among others -- and he was an energizing rhythm guitarist behind Grappelli, pushing theirgroups into a higher gear. Not only did Reinhardt put his stamp upon jazz, his string band music also had an impact upon theparallel development of Western swing, which eventually fed into the wellspring of what is now called country music. Althoughhe could not read music, with Grappelli and on his own, Reinhardt composed several winsome, highly original tunes like"Daphne," "Nuages" and "Manoir de Mes Reves," as well as mad swingers like "Minor Swing" and the ode to his record label ofthe '30s, "Stomping at Decca." As the late Ralph Gleason said about Django's recordings, "They were European and they wereFrench and they were still jazz."A violinist first and a guitarist later, Jean Baptiste "Django" Reinhardt grew up in a gypsy camp near Paris where he absorbedthe gypsy strain into his music. A disastrous caravan fire in 1928 badly burned his left hand, depriving him of the use of thefourth and fifth fingers, but the resourceful Reinhardt figured out a novel fingering system to get around the problem thatprobably accounts for some of the originality of his style. According to one story, during his recovery period, Reinhardt wasintroduced to American jazz when he found a 78 RPM disc of Louis Armstrong's "Dallas Blues" at an Orleans flea market. Hethen resumed his career playing in Parisian cafes until one day in 1934 when Hot Club chief Pierre Nourry proposed the idea ofan all-string band to Reinhardt and Grappelli. Thus was born the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, which quickly became aninternational draw thanks to a long, splendid series of Ultraphone, Decca and HMV recordings.The outbreak of war in 1939 broke up the Quintette, with Grappelli remaining in London where the group was playing andReinhardt returning to France. During the war years, he led a big band, another quintet with clarinetist Hubert Rostaing inplace of Grappelli, and after the liberation of Paris, recorded with such visiting American jazzmen as Mel Powell, PeanutsHucko and Ray McKinley. In 1946, Reinhardt took up the electric guitar and toured America as a soloist with the DukeEllington band but his appearances were poorly received. Some of his recordings on electric guitar late in his life are bopescapades where his playing sounds frantic and jagged, a world apart from the jubilant swing of old. However, starting in Jan.1946, Reinhardt and Grappelli held several sporadic reunions where the bop influences are more subtly integrated into the old,still-fizzing swing format. In the 1950s, Reinhardt became more reclusive, remaining in Europe, playing and recording now andthen until his death from a stroke in 1953. His Hot Club recordings from the `30s are his most irresistible legacy; their spiritand sound can be felt in current groups like Holland's Rosenberg Trio. « hide

Similar Bands: Wes Montgomery, Grant Green, Jim Hall

LPs
Djangology
2005

4.4
24 Votes
Et le Quintette du Hot Club de France
1961

3.6
8 Votes
Compilations
The Essential Django Reinhardt
2011

4.5
1 Votes
Djangologie
2009

4.7
8 Votes
The Complete Django Reinhardt HMV Sessions
2000

4
1 Votes
The Best Of Django Reinhardt
1996

4.3
48 Votes

Contributors: Ziguvan, rockandmetaljunkie, jesusnpals, FrontierPsychiatrist, NormanN, YankeeDudel, Parallels, Disconnected,

FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2014 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy