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Antonin Dvorak

Born on September 8th, 1841, Dvorak entered a world where the romantic era was already well set. Thankfully, his parents,a modest village couple, discovered their son’s musical abilities at the very young age of six, where he was quickly sent to study music at the local village school. He would later venture into more professional tidings within the city of Prague,where he studied the viola, and played for the Bohemian Provisional Theater Orchestra, which had its own lengthy relationship with its conductor, Bedrich Smetana; a later influence on Dvorak’s musical style. Feeling pressur ...read more

Born on September 8th, 1841, Dvorak entered a world where the romantic era was already well set. Thankfully, his parents,a modest village couple, discovered their son’s musical abilities at the very young age of six, where he was quickly sent to study music at the local village school. He would later venture into more professional tidings within the city of Prague,where he studied the viola, and played for the Bohemian Provisional Theater Orchestra, which had its own lengthy relationship with its conductor, Bedrich Smetana; a later influence on Dvorak’s musical style. Feeling pressured, both financially and personally, he quit the orchestra to pursue a career in composition in 1871, after nearly a decade submerged below the confinement of the performing lifestyle.

Rather quickly, Dvorak soon embedded himself within the claws of romantic composition. He became very successful throughout the 1870’s, both in Europe and England, chiefly in London. His success can be found deep inside his Czech roots,which tatter themselves throughout his music, his 9 symphonies, and in particular his “Slavonic Dances.” The sound created by much or his work strikes a direct affiliation between the wood grain of the Bohemian countryside and his earlier influences such as Ludwig van Beethoven, and the later Bedrich Smetana.

After sometime composing, and sometimes performing, Dvorak settled himself on the bedrock of the New World between the years of 1892-1985. It was here that he was to compose perhaps his most treasured work, Symphony No. 9 in E minor, more commonly known as the “Symphony From the New World.” Preceding this milestone, he ventured into the heart of the country, along the way gathering many musical influences, from the tribal Amerindian folklore, to Nergo melodic tunes. Both of these forces would play a major part in all his further composition. Despite being very successful in the United States,he dearly missed his homeland, and decided to return.

As always, his success wasn’t damaged by his shift, and he quickly regained his loyal fan base, while assembling others along the way. Completing his musical journey, Dvorak decided to explore the opera, and chamber music. Like other things,he did well in these two genres. His opera “Rusalka,” the most well known of the ten he composed, and his Cello Concerto in B minor were held to high critical acclaim from both his fans, and fellow counterparts. He continued composing until his death.

Antonin Dvorak died on May 1st, 1904. He left behind a legacy for all future Czech composers, particularly that of his son in law, Josef Suk, who payed tribute to him (and his daughter) in his “Symphony in C minor,” with the subtitle “Asrael”(angel of death). His music can be found in between the boundaries of the great Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, and the earlier romantic heavy-weights Anton Bruckner, and Franz Liszt, while at the same time managing to track a course of its own. « hide

Similar Bands: Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Bedrich Smetana, Felix Mendelssohn, Johannes Brahms

LPs
The Wild Dove, Op. 110, B. 198
1896

4
1 Votes
String Quartet No. 13
1895

Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, B. 191
1895

4.4
9 Votes
8 Humoresques for piano, Op. 101
1894

5
2 Votes
Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, B. 178
1893

4.4
111 Votes
String Quartet No. 12 ("The American")
1893

4.3
6 Votes
Carnival Overture, Op. 92, B. 169
1892

4
5 Votes
Requiem in B♭ minor, Op. 89, B. 165
1890

4.6
4 Votes
Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88, B. 163
1889

4.4
7 Votes
Slavonic Dances No. 2, Op. 72, B. 145
1886

4
12 Votes
Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1885

4.6
4 Votes
Violin Concerto, Op.53
1883

4.3
2 Votes
Hussite Overture, Op. 67, B. 132
1883

2.8
2 Votes
Symphony No. 6 in D major, Op. 60, B. 112
1880

4.1
5 Votes
Slavonic Dances No. 1, Op. 46, B. 78
1878

3.7
7 Votes
Stabat Mater, Op. 58
1877

4.4
4 Votes
Serenade for Strings
1876

4.3
6 Votes
Piano Concerto in G minor, Op. 33
1876

4.3
2 Votes
Symphony No. 5 in F major, Op. 76, B. 54
1875

4.8
2 Votes
Symphony No. 4 in D minor, Op. 13, B. 41
1874

4.8
2 Votes
Symphony No. 3 in E♭ major, Op. 10, B. 34
1873

4.4
5 Votes
Symphony No. 2 in B♭ major, Op. 4, B. 12
1866

4.6
4 Votes
Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 3, B. 9
1865

4.4
4 Votes
Compilations
Dvorak: Very Best of
2006

Contributors: forkliftjones, Greem, dariosoares, FR33L0RD, taylormemer, methylorange42, Insurrection, Havey, CosmicPie, TRMshadow, Idnuf,

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